Ebola in Dallas | KERA News

Ebola in Dallas

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On Sept. 30, 2014, the United States had its first diagnosis of the Ebola virus. Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national, tested positive for the virus days after he was initially sent home from a Dallas emergency room. Many questions arose since that fatal diagnosis: how two nurses contracted the virus from Duncan, the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian to keep its workers safe, whether Duncan received proper medical care, and more.

Here you’ll find KERA’s coverage of events, including radio stories, live blogs, and a timeline detailing what happened that fall.

@RevJJackson / Twitter

[This post will be updated throughout the day.] This week will be a critical period for health officials who are trying to contain the Ebola virus, Texas  Department of Health and Human Services commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Tuesday afternoon.

Last month, the United States made two promises to Liberia.

On Sept. 8, Obama pledged that the U.S. would construct a 25-bed hospital outside Monrovia, the capital, to treat health care workers. They've been bearing the brunt of the outbreak: In Liberia alone, at least 188 health workers have been infected and 94 have died.

Then, on Sept. 16, Obama announced a massive response to the outbreak, involving thousands of U.S. troops on the ground to train health care workers, deliver relief supplies and build 17 Ebola treatment centers for the general public.

The classic slogan for Firestone tires was "where the rubber meets the road."

When it comes to Ebola, the rubber met the road at the Firestone rubber plantation in Harbel, Liberia.

Harbel is a company town not far from the capital city of Monrovia. It was named in 1926 after the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Harvey and his wife, Idabelle. Today, Firestone workers and their families make up a community of 80,000 people across the plantation.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Thomas Duncan, the Ebola patient in Dallas, remains in critical condition, Texas Health Presbyterian announced Monday afternoon. His condition is stable, the hospital says. Duncan is receiving an an experimental drug, called brincidofovir, for Ebola.

Bob Booth / The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Five stories that have North Texas talking: stigma follows the family of Ebola patient Thomas Duncan, storms delay Oncor’s efforts to restore power for customers, it’s the last day to register to vote before Nov. 4, and more.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

The man being treated for Ebola at Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas is in critical condition. On Sunday, the health officials said his condition took a turn for the worse. Meanwhile, the North Texas faith community has been praying for him and his family.

City of Dallas / Twitter/@1500Marilla

Update, 2:35 p.m. Sunday: Authorities say they've located a homeless man who needs to be monitored because he may have had contact with the lone Ebola patient in the United States.

Update at 3:26 p.m. ET. Man Is Located:

Authorities have located a homeless man who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man diagnosed with Ebola in a Dallas hospital, the AP reports, quoting a Dallas city spokeswoman.

Earlier today, authorities said the man was in the ambulance that took Duncan to the hospital.

While he is a "low-risk individual," health authorities still want to monitor him for symptoms throughout the disease's incubation period of 21 days.

Our Original Post Continues:

Flickr / americannurseproject

The lone U.S. Ebola patient is in critical condition, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital announced Saturday afternoon. The patient, Thomas Eric Duncan, has been isolated since he arrived at the hospital last weekend.

Of the 114 people whom officials first thought could possibly have been exposed to the Liberian man diagnosed with Ebola in Texas, health experts are "fairly certain" that only nine had enough direct contact that they could potentially have been infected.

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