Ebola in Dallas | KERA News

Ebola in Dallas

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On Sept. 30, 2014, the United States had its first diagnosis of the Ebola virus. Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national, tested positive for the virus days after he was initially sent home from a Dallas emergency room. Many questions arose since that fatal diagnosis: how two nurses contracted the virus from Duncan, the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian to keep its workers safe, whether Duncan received proper medical care, and more.

Here you’ll find KERA’s coverage of events, including radio stories, live blogs, and a timeline detailing what happened that fall.

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[We will update this story throughout the day.] The financial impact of Ebola on Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has been significant. Net revenue is down 25.6 percent – or $8.1 million -- in October compared to the first nine months of 2014, according to financial disclosure forms released Wednesday afternoon.

When It Came To Ebola, Control Eluded Texas Leaders

Oct 22, 2014
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

When the Ebola virus first arrived in Texas, Gov. Rick Perry greeted the grave news with trademark swagger.

“There is no place in the world, I will suggest to you, that has better professionals, better ability to address this, than in Texas,” he said at a hastily called press conference, one day after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive for Ebola while in isolation at a Dallas hospital.

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[We will update this story throughout the day.] The condition of Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse infected with Ebola, has been upgraded to good from fair, the National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday afternoon.

Emory University Hospital/YouTube

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.

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There is no drug to treat Ebola that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But there are companies selling products claiming to do just that.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Yesterday was the first Sunday at Our Lady of Fatima Church since Nina Pham, the first nurse to become infected with the Ebola virus, was transferred from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to Maryland for continued treatment.

Updated at 5:31 p.m. ET

It's Monday, and Ebola still dominates the headlines. Here's a roundup of some of the latest developments:

Duncan's Family Completes 21-Day Quarantine:

A health care worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

Cooper Neill/Texas Tribune

Fear and reactions to the Dallas Ebola cases are making news around the country.

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