The Dallas Shootings: A Look Back | KERA News

The Dallas Shootings: A Look Back

Officers scramble to track the gunman who killed five cops and injured 11 other people on July 7 in downtown Dallas
Credit Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News

On July 7, a peaceful protest was ending in downtown Dallas. It was a rally like many across the country --sparked by the deaths of black men shot by police in Baton Rouge, Minnesota and other cities. Then, suddenly, the atmosphere changed. A gunman opened fire. Five officers were killed. Nine others, and two civilians, were injured.

Here's a complete look at how KERA News covered what happened -- from the protest to the shooting to the mourning. KERA profiled each of the slain officers in a series called Remembering the Fallen, and produced hours of coverage broadcast on public radio stations across the country.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

It’s been almost a month since a gunman opened fire on police officers downtown Dallas. Since then, the department has been sorting through a deluge of job applications. Last week, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton gave a shout out to the city.

Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News Special Contributor

It’s been three weeks since a gunman opened fire on police at the end of a peaceful protest in downtown Dallas. The group behind that rally is planning a silent march on Friday night.

JAVIER GIRIBET-VARGAS / KERA NEWS SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR

On July 5, Alton Sterling was killed by police officers in Baton Rouge. Two days later in downtown Dallas, at the end of a peaceful protest against the police killings of Sterling and other black men, a lone shooter gunned down five police officers.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the days since a gunman shot and killed five police officers in downtown Dallas, group after group has called for a new kind of conversation about police and race relations.

Commentary: Confronting Bigotry In Others And Ourselves

Jul 22, 2016
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Recent shootings in Dallas, Baton Rouge, Minnesota and Orlando, Florida have raised concerns about racism and bigotry. The head of the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas suggests the solution to these problems may start within ourselves. William Holston points to his own background as an example.

JAVIER GIRIBET-VARGAS / KERA NEWS

The doors to El Centro College in downtown Dallas are finally opening up to faculty and staff Wednesday morning. Students return to class on Thursday.

A KERA Intern's Trial By (Gun)Fire

Jul 19, 2016
Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News

Since I was a child, I’ve dreamed of being a journalistic first responder. Last week, I got to cross that off my bucket list. And for a moment, I thought it was the last thing I’d ever do.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said Monday he wants to classify attacks on police as hate crimes. The idea has the backing of law enforcement groups, but it’s raised some concerns among advocates for hate crimes legislation.

Charley Wilkison says police officers feel like they have a target on their backs. He’s the head of the Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas. That feeling, he says, started long before cops were gunned down in Dallas and Baton Rouge.

Four Ways Americans Can Unite In Spite Of Recent Violence

Jul 18, 2016
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Violence across the country this summer — in Orlando, Dallas and Baton Rouge – along with videos of shootings of civilians by police has many Americans on edge. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Washington University associate law professor John Inazu about ways to bridge the current divides within American society. John Inazu is the author of, “Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference.”

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: One day after Dallas buried the last of its five officers, a shooter killed three more in Baton Rouge; see which Texans will attend the Republican National Convention; a father and son with North Texas roots were lost in the Nice attack; and more.

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