Dallas history | KERA News

Dallas history

Jerome Weeks/KERA

The Lakewood Theater has been an institution in East Dallas since 1938, and its owners are looking for new tenants. Preservationists said the original space -- filled with a single movie screen, whimsical murals and a grand, carved staircase -- could be drastically changed.

Arthur Rothstein / Library of Congress

Forgotten lore from Dallas, fascinating photos from iconic landmarks, and a cornucopia of North Texas history -- it's all online at Flashbackdallas.com. Paula Bosse runs the website and she talks about her passion for the city and its curious past.

Justin Terveen

This story was originally published on Feb. 1, 2015: It may seem like politicians and planners have spent just a decade or two sparring over the proposed Trinity River toll road, but controversy has swirled around the Trinity much longer than that - ever since folks began settling beside it nearly two centuries ago.

Coltera / Flickr

Note: This interview contains some graphic descriptions that may be uncomfortable. 

In 1908, a ceremonial arch lit up downtown Dallas at the corner of Main and Akard streets. It was built by the Elks Club, with a gaudy sign that proclaimed “Welcome Visitors.” It became an iconic symbol of an ambitious city. 

By 1910, it became a different kind of symbol when a mob hung the body of a black man named Allen Brooks from the arch.