cybersecurity | KERA News

cybersecurity

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The debate over government access to personal and private information dates back decades. But it took center stage after the 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, when Apple refused to open a backdoor into an assailant's encrypted cell phone for FBI investigators.

The agency ultimately paid a hacker to unlock the phone instead.

From Texas Standard.

Multiple school districts in north and northeast Texas were notified by the Texas Department of Agriculture recently that they were likely exposed to a data breach. The warning estimates that personal information of some 700 students across 39 districts could have been leaked when an employee’s state-issued laptop was hit with a ransomware attack.

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A malware attack earlier this summer caused disruption around the world. June's WannaCry cyber assault locked down hospitals, government offices and major corporations and held their data hostage for cash.

Worried about Internet companies snooping on your online browsing? You might turn to something called a virtual private network to protect your privacy. But researchers say these networks can themselves be insecure.

Earlier this year, the federal government rolled back rules that would have prevented Internet service providers from tracking your activity online.

In the neonatal intensive care unit of Cook Children's Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas, a father is rocking a baby attached to a heart monitor. While doctors roam the halls trying to prevent infections, Chief Information Officer Theresa Meadows is worried about another kind of virus.

"The last thing anybody wants to happen in their organization is have all their heart monitors disabled or all of their IV pumps that provide medication to a patient disabled," Meadows says.

What You Need To Know About Ransomware

Jun 29, 2016
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Cybercriminals used to steal credit card numbers and sell them to other criminals to manufacture fake cards. Now they steal data and hold it ransom. Yesterday on Think, Lauren Silverman talked with Josephine Wolff, an assistant professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, about this shifting business model in cybercrime.   

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As our devices get smarter, they also are at risk of more sophisticated cyber security attacks.

Yes, that car connected to the internet makes tracking trips and monitoring teen drivers easier, but it also means killing the motor with a few keystrokes is no longer science fiction.

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Last week, cyber attackers took on targets ranging from the White House to the town of Cleburne in North Texas.

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Dallas-based AT&T suffered a potential security breach involving the data of about 1,600 accounts.

Jay Mallin

A $7.75 million gift from Darwin Deason will launch the Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security and support the Deason Innovation Gym in Southern Methodist University’s Lyle School of Engineering.

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Target is recommending its customers, including those in Texas, pay close attention to their credit and debit card statements. The company says personal information on some 40 million card users may have been collected at its stores over the past month.

But this news didn’t discourage North Texans from shopping.

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So who’s on healthcare.gov? Turns out it’s not just people searching for health care. The site is also attracting hackers — a Department of Homeland Security official told lawmakers there’s been “a handful” of attempts so far. National cyber security expert Fred Chang, who’s now a professor at SMU in Dallas, has been called to examine concerns about lack of privacy of users of the website.

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Security breaches with iPads provided to Lewisville ISD students is an issue being debated by three candidates vying for an open school board seat. 

The Dallas Morning News looks at how the candidates would address the district's aggressive plan to put technology in the hands of students. All of the candidates are "critical of the security breaches and system crashes that have accompanied the initiative," The News reports.

Help Wanted: Hackers

May 8, 2013
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The Obama administration this week accused China’s military of mounting attacks on American government computer systems and defense contractors. Commentator Rena Pederson says it’s just one example of a growing problem – one that could be at least partly addressed in the classroom.