Commentaries | KERA News

Commentaries

KERA has refocused its approach to commentaries on the radio and the web. We aim to explore the issues of the day, but not in the type of pieces you’d routinely find on op-ed pages of newspapers. Instead, we do it through storytelling and personal experiences.  

Diversity is a primary goal – across politics, ethnicity, age, geography. KERA aims to sound more like North Texas, with a wide variety of voices covering a wide variety of topics.

Immediacy is key. When reflecting on a news event, the piece should be turned around within a couple of days. Airing more than a week after a news event is often too late. And, when a news event can be anticipated, we try to air the commentary the day of that event.

Brevity is crucial. The piece should not exceed three minutes. Read aloud and time the commentary before submitting it.

So is food for thought.  A good radio commentary gives the media consumer something to think about well after its presentation ends, not just the writer’s point of view.

Here are a few examples that fit the criteria:

How To Submit

Submit commentaries by email, with a suggested two-sentence host introduction and a one-sentence “tagline” for the host to read that describes the commentator (Ex: “Jane Doe is a writer from Dallas.”) Please include your complete contact information: email address, phone number, Twitter and Facebook handles.

Whom To Contact

Sam Baker, Senior Editor

Email: sbaker@kera.org | Phone: 214-740-9244 | Twitter: @srbkera

Study Up For 'Think': The American Warfare State

Jun 26, 2014
U.S. Army / Flickr CC

Despite concerns over deficit and unnecessary wars, Congress spends over $700 billion on the military each year, as much as the rest of the world combined. Today at 1 p.m. on 'Think', Krys Boyd will be speak with professor Rebecca Thorpe, author of The American Warfare State: The Domestic Politics of Military Spending.

Each year on June 20th, World Refugee Day recognizes the resilience of forcibly displaced people across the globe. Commentator William Holston says refugees are closer to you than you know.

Lian Chang / Flickr CC

Ever wonder about who's working behind the stage at a Radiohead concert? Or who's involved in translating negotiations for ambassadors at the UN? Today at noon on 'Think', we'll be talking about the people whose work is barely noticed with author David Zweig and his new book Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work In An Age of Relentless Self-Promotion.

KERA

About 800 participants from around the world discussed the future of the urban world at the New Cities Summit in Dallas. Commentator Lee Cullum considers the summit’s theme: “Re-imagining Cities.”

ezio_armando / Flickr

There may be old truth to the cliche saying, “That what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger.” The classical ideology of Stoicism associates that idea to all sorts of challenges we face. Ryan Holiday joins Krys Boyd on “Think” today at 1 p.m. to discuss the power of this philosophy and his new book The Obstacle is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph.

Bialy at Flickr

The war in Mexico between the state and the drug cartels has claimed over 60,000 lives since 2006.

At noon today on Think, author Michael Deibert will discuss his new book In The Shadow of Saint Death: The Gulf Cartel and The Price of America’s Drug War In Mexico.

Humorists Don't Walk The Line

Apr 7, 2014

Writer, commentator and former educator Tom Dodge also has been called a humorist in some circles. It's not a word he takes lightly. Then again, maybe he should.

William Holston, Commentator

All week, NPR has reported on life along the U.S.-Mexico border. In his commentary, William Holston focuses on one particular group of immigrants growing in number in North Texas.

The parliament of the breakaway republic of Crimea has formally asked Russia to annex it. Crimeans over the weekend voted to split from Ukraine. And the political unrest there has commentator Lee Cullum thinking back to an earlier revolution.

India's Lost Decade

Feb 11, 2014

A recent visit left commentator Lee Cullum with strong impressions of India, and not all of them positive.

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