Commentaries | KERA News

Commentaries

KERA has refocused its approach to commentaries on the radio and the web. We aim to explore the issues of the day, but not in the type of pieces you’d routinely find on op-ed pages of newspapers. Instead, we do it through storytelling and personal experiences.  

Diversity is a primary goal – across politics, ethnicity, age, geography. KERA aims to sound more like North Texas, with a wide variety of voices covering a wide variety of topics.

Immediacy is key. When reflecting on a news event, the piece should be turned around within a couple of days. Airing more than a week after a news event is often too late. And, when a news event can be anticipated, we try to air the commentary the day of that event.

Brevity is crucial. The piece should not exceed three minutes. Read aloud and time the commentary before submitting it.

So is food for thought.  A good radio commentary gives the media consumer something to think about well after its presentation ends, not just the writer’s point of view.

Here are a few examples that fit the criteria:

How To Submit

Submit commentaries by email, with a suggested two-sentence host introduction and a one-sentence “tagline” for the host to read that describes the commentator (Ex: “Jane Doe is a writer from Dallas.”) Please include your complete contact information: email address, phone number, Twitter and Facebook handles.

Whom To Contact

Sam Baker, Senior Editor

Email: sbaker@kera.org | Phone: 214-740-9244 | Twitter: @srbkera

Domestic Violence In Immigrant Communities

Oct 30, 2014
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Each minute, 24 people are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States. That’s according to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and William Holston of the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas explains in this commentary why immigrants face additional challenges.

Diwali: Celebrating Awareness Of The Inner Light

Oct 22, 2014
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Study Up For 'Think': Using The Food We Waste

Oct 14, 2014
Shutterstock

Food waste is a huge problem in industrialized nations where many households and businesses have more food than they really need. Today, in the second hour of 'Think' we'll be speaking to Elizabeth Royte, who writes about better uses for food waste in the November issue of National Geographic.

Commentary: The Tumbleweeds Are Back

Sep 4, 2014
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Don’t let the recent rains fool you. We’re still in drought and commentator David Marquis says there’s no reason to get comfortable.

Jeff Heimsath / Texas Tribune

The U.S. locks up more kids than any other industrialized nation in the world. Today at 1 p.m. on Think, we'll be speaking to author and journalist Nell Bernstein about the phenomenon and alternatives to locking kids up in her book Burning Down The House: The End Of Juvenile Prison.

Study Up For 'Think': What Went Wrong In Iraq

Jul 29, 2014
Stringer/Iraq/Reuters/Corbis / PBS

Now that the Sunni extremist group known as the Islamic State has taken over much of north and western Iraq, many Westerners are left wondering what went wrong in the country. Today at noon on 'Think', we'll be speaking with Jim Gilmore, reporter and a producer of the Frontline documentary "Losing Iraq".

Study Up For 'Think': Marijuana By Numbers

Jul 24, 2014
Brett Levin / Flickr CC

With the legal weed market starting up in Colorado and Washington this year, marijuana is being widely discussed among scientists and researchers across the country. Today at noon on Think, we'll be speaking with Dr. Francesca Filbey and Dr. Robert Morris, two researchers at UT Dallas who've recently completed studies about pot, addiction and crime.

Muhammad Ghafari / Wikimedia CC

During the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011, many Americans thought the abrupt change of the political climate in the region would bring lasting improvements. But was this optimism justified? Today at noon on 'Think', we'll be speaking with Juan Cole, author of The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East.

afagen / Flickr

The United States Census Bureau reported that Asians were the fastest growing race or ethnic group in 2012, with a growth rate of 2.9%. But as the Asian American population continues to grow, what does it mean to identify as a part of that group? Today on Think at 1 p.m., Citizen University founder and former Clinton advisor Eric Liu joins Krys Boyd to talk about his new book A Chinaman’s Chance: One Family’s Journey and the Chinese American Dream.

Gordon Hyde / Wikimedia CC

Tens of thousands of unaccompanied children have entered the U.S. in recent months illegally - and it's being declared a humanitarian crisis. Today at noon on 'Think' we'll be speaking with Aviva Chomsky, author of Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal.

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