college admissions | KERA News

college admissions

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Last week, The College Board released the latest batch of SAT scores for high school students – and they’re down nationwide. They’re even worse in Texas. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the Arlington school district, 20 percent of graduating seniors and as many as 27 percent of Hispanic graduates in the Arlington school district don’t apply to college. That startling number is why the district has been partnering with local universities to ensure more students move beyond high school. The latest effort is with the University of North Texas.

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A new report raises questions about whether tests like the SAT and ACT are a good indicator of how well students will do in college. The study, which was published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, looked at student data from 33 colleges and universities around the country that have optional admissions policies.

You can see an interview with the study’s author below and read more about it here.

UTA

Within weeks some 1500 high school sophomores in the Arlington school district will receive letters telling them their admission to the University of Texas in Arlington is guaranteed, even though they have two more years of high school to complete.

Students from low-income families often don’t apply to the best schools in the country. Ivy League universities like Harvard have noticed and are trying to figure out how best to connect with those students.

Yesterday’s show Here & Now featured a story from Houston’s public radio station KUHF that looks at how one program there is tackling this issue head-on.

Roy Kaltschmidt / Flickr Creative Commons

The Common Application program is supposed to help high schoolers apply to multiple colleges via the web. But owing to software snafus, some students haven’t been able to apply to schools or correctly send text or process credit card charges, among other problems. That’s according to The New York Times.