Clay Jenkins | KERA News

Clay Jenkins

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Saymendy Lloyd, a friend of the woman who planned to marry Thomas Duncan, spoke on behalf of the family of the Dallas Ebola patient during a press conference Friday afternoon. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Health officials today zeroed in on the Vickery Meadow apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan had been staying while he visited relatives. Those family members were ordered by the state to stay in that apartment so health officials can monitor them.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

North Texans trying to attract Tesla’s massive electric battery plant to south Dallas County will officially get the disappointing news Thursday.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Those 2,000 immigrant children will not be coming to temporary shelters in Dallas County after all, the county's top elected official announced Thursday afternoon.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

So far, most of the debate over the immigrant children who have crossed the Texas border has been political. On Monday, an event featuring religious and community leaders supporting those children put a spotlight on a girl in the middle of that debate. She told her story with the help of a translator.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

President Obama and Gov. Rick Perry put aside partisan differences, at least briefly, this week to share a helicopter across Dallas and discuss securing the border. The president and the governor then sat down with a group of local officials and religious leaders who are preparing to shelter 2,000 immigrant children who've been housed in cramped detention facilities. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County Commissioners will meet Tuesday morning as controversy builds over County Judge Clay Jenkins' recent announcement that the county would help the federal government set up centers for 2,000 immigrant children. The lone Republican county commissioner, Mike Cantrell, doesn’t think Jenkins’ idea is a good one.

Justin Martin / KERA News

With a single statement last weekend, County Judge Clay Jenkins put Dallas in the center of the national debate over the 52,000 immigrant children who’ve crossed the U.S.-Mexico border since last fall.

Jenkins offered to take roughly 2,000 of the kids into new temporary North Texas centers by the end of the month. In this week’s Friday Conversation, the county’s top official sits down with KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins’ announcement Saturday to temporarily house as many as 2,000 children who've entered the country illegally surprised many people. Now, some local groups are preparing to meet with Jenkins to find out how they'll be helping.

Erik Hersman / (cc) flickr

Dallas County Commissioners are discussing whether to pony up more money to reach voters whose photo IDs don’t match their elections records.

The Democratic county judge says it’s an effort to make sure everyone who’s registered gets to vote, but the commission’s lone Republican thinks there’s another reason.

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