Clay Jenkins | KERA News

Clay Jenkins

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

More than 60 million people have been displaced from their homes because of conflict around the world – officials say that number is unprecedented.

SMU hosted a conversation about the global refugee crisis Tuesday evening. Former First Lady Laura Bush was among more than 150 people who attended.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

City and county leaders in Dallas Tuesday announced a partnership of organizations focused on tackling homelessness. Their appointees will work with nonprofits and private groups to strengthen the efforts.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas school and county leaders have unveiled truancy reforms aimed at keeping more kids in class.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

Throughout North Texas, there are very few competitive state legislative races, and they all happen to be in Dallas County. Democrats in the county are hoping that changing demographics, higher turnout and Donald Trump might be the right combination to help them take a handful of Republican-held seats.

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

Less than 24 hours after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan was confirmed to have the Ebola virus, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins was thrust into a leadership role few people had trained for.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

A federal appeals court in New Orleans is set to hear arguments over President Barack Obama's plan to protect as many as 5 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. from deportation.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

A year after the launch of the Affordable Care Act, more than half a million Dallas County residents still lack health insurance. Dallas officials joined the Health and Human Services Secretary urging people to sign up.

In Blue Dallas County, Republicans Play Defense

Oct 29, 2014
Ross Ramsey / The Texas Tribune

On the first day of early voting, politics was not at the top of Dallas' concerns. Instead, residents were obsessed with Ebola, a disease less threatening to their lives, statistically, than the furniture in their homes. 

Texas Health Resources

Nina Pham, the first infected nurse with Ebola in Dallas, is back home in North Texas. She arrived late Friday night at  Fort Worth's Meacham International Airport. Her family was there to greet her.

Emory University Hospital/YouTube

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

On Monday, early voting begins in Texas.  If you haven’t heard a lot about it, that might be because the evolving Ebola crisis in Dallas has overwhelmed news coverage -- even in one campaign where the Ebola response seems to be the issue.

Texas Health Resources / Twitter

Dozens of Dallas health care workers who had contact with the man who died from the Ebola virus have been asked to sign legal documents in which they'll agree to stay home.

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

The first nurse to contract Ebola is being moved to Maryland to make room at Texas Health Presbyterian in case there are other Ebola patients in Dallas, County Judge Clay Jenkins told KERA.

NIAID / Flickr

Saymendy Lloyd, a friend of the woman who planned to marry Thomas Duncan, spoke on behalf of the family of the Dallas Ebola patient during a press conference Friday afternoon. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Health officials today zeroed in on the Vickery Meadow apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan had been staying while he visited relatives. Those family members were ordered by the state to stay in that apartment so health officials can monitor them.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

North Texans trying to attract Tesla’s massive electric battery plant to south Dallas County will officially get the disappointing news Thursday.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Those 2,000 immigrant children will not be coming to temporary shelters in Dallas County after all, the county's top elected official announced Thursday afternoon.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

So far, most of the debate over the immigrant children who have crossed the Texas border has been political. On Monday, an event featuring religious and community leaders supporting those children put a spotlight on a girl in the middle of that debate. She told her story with the help of a translator.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

President Obama and Gov. Rick Perry put aside partisan differences, at least briefly, this week to share a helicopter across Dallas and discuss securing the border. The president and the governor then sat down with a group of local officials and religious leaders who are preparing to shelter 2,000 immigrant children who've been housed in cramped detention facilities. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County Commissioners will meet Tuesday morning as controversy builds over County Judge Clay Jenkins' recent announcement that the county would help the federal government set up centers for 2,000 immigrant children. The lone Republican county commissioner, Mike Cantrell, doesn’t think Jenkins’ idea is a good one.

Justin Martin / KERA News

With a single statement last weekend, County Judge Clay Jenkins put Dallas in the center of the national debate over the 52,000 immigrant children who’ve crossed the U.S.-Mexico border since last fall.

Jenkins offered to take roughly 2,000 of the kids into new temporary North Texas centers by the end of the month. In this week’s Friday Conversation, the county’s top official sits down with KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins’ announcement Saturday to temporarily house as many as 2,000 children who've entered the country illegally surprised many people. Now, some local groups are preparing to meet with Jenkins to find out how they'll be helping.

Erik Hersman / (cc) flickr

Dallas County Commissioners are discussing whether to pony up more money to reach voters whose photo IDs don’t match their elections records.

The Democratic county judge says it’s an effort to make sure everyone who’s registered gets to vote, but the commission’s lone Republican thinks there’s another reason.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

In just a few days, Texans will be able to start going online to check out health insurance options as part of the Affordable Care Act. And today an all-star cast headlined by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius came to Dallas to pitch the new marketplace. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County’s Truancy Court has spent the summer in the spotlight. The U.S.  Department of Justice is looking into allegations that students were denied their constitutional rights.  The County rejects the charges. Meet two kids who’ve been through system.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins believes the county's same-sex benefits plan approved last fall is legal, despite Monday's opinion from the Texas Attorney General that said local governments and school districts offering marriage benefits to same sex partners violate the state constitution. 

surroundsound5000 / (cc) flickr

The idea of counties expanding Medicaid with the Affordable Care Act is getting some traction in North Texas. Governor Perry has said the state won’t do it.

rp4prez2008 / (cc) flickr

Dallas County reports a third death from West Nile Virus. The patient lived in Grand Prairie. Health officials say all three victims had the more serious neuroinvasive strain of the mosquito-transmitted illness.

BJ Austin / KERA News

The gavel-grabbing incident began as County Judge Clay Jenkins lightly tapped his gavel to interrupt a testy exchange between Commissioners Maurine Dickey and Mike Cantrell.  

Bill Zeeble / KERA

In an unusual move, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins ordered a barrier erected to keep the press away from court members, including Commissioner John Wiley Price.

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