Civil Rights Act | KERA News

Civil Rights Act

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Today, March 7, marks the 50th anniversary of a bloody milestone in the Civil Rights Movement – when marchers in Selma, Alabama were attacked by police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. On Friday, a busload from SMU began retracing the route a group of students, faculty and staff took a half century ago.

White House Photo Office/LBJ Library

Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. NPR has produced an in-depth online report about the act and what it means to the country.

Today Cotulla, Texas, is reaping the benefits of an oil and natural gas boom in the Eagle Ford Shale. But in 1928, the South Texas town was incredibly poor — and that's how Lyndon Johnson saw it when he had his first job there at age 20.

Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com

A half-century after the passage of sweeping civil rights legislation, President Barack Obama declared that he had "lived out the promise" envisioned by Lyndon B. Johnson, the president who championed the push for greater racial equality.

Marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, which Johnson signed into law, Obama lauded his Democratic predecessor's ability to grasp like few others the power of government to bring about change and swing open the doors of opportunity for millions of Americans.

When President Lyndon Johnson signed the 1964 Civil Rights Act 50 years ago this summer, it was a huge legislative achievement. But in terms of LBJ's legacy, this landmark legislation is overshadowed by his escalation of a failed war in Vietnam.

Now, there's an effort underway to reassess the 36th President of the United States and to put some of the focus back on an issue that improved the lives of millions of Americans.

Yoichi Okamoto / LBJ Library photo

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Paying tribute to LBJ; a Van Cliburn auction; tonight’s the last night for the Chinese Lantern Festival; and more.

When President Lyndon B. Johnson met at the White House with the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. on Jan. 18, 1964, the two men were near the peak of their powers and the country was in a maelstrom.