Bullying | KERA News

Bullying

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

Texas schools are required by law to protect students from bullying, ever since the Texas Legislature passed a bullying and cyber-bullying bill in 2011. As part of the KERA Yearbook project, here are three stories about bullying from three high school students who have experienced it.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Fort Worth City Council member Joel Burns is resigning the seat that State Sen. Wendy Davis once held. Burns, who is openly gay, has been in office since 2008. Burns talked to KERA about his time on the council, plans to attend Harvard this fall, and that tearful, unexpected council speech four years ago that went viral online.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Middle school can be a tough transitional period. Students leave the comfortable nest of elementary school and face new challenges like harder classes and older kids.

 

You'd expect bullies to grow up to get in trouble with the law.

But children who are consistently bullied also are more likely to run afoul of the law as adults, including being arrested and jailed.

Almost 14 percent of people who said they were bullied repeatedly in childhood and their teens had been in prison, compared to 6 percent of people who weren't bullied, according to a study.

Women who were repeatedly bullied before age 18 were more likely to use alcohol or drugs than men, and also more likely to be arrested and incarcerated.

PBS NewsHour

Can babies teach kids about empathy and bullying? A program in Seattle aims to do just that. As part of public media's American Graduate initiative, PBS NewsHour spotlights children in one elementary school classroom who are learning how to treat others. The teacher: a seven-month old baby girl.

f letter / flickr

Five stories North Texas is talking about: the battle against bullying, party in the deck park, ‘Nones’ and their habits and more.

Dallas, TX – October 12th is "Bullying Awareness Day" in Fort Worth. The city council passed the resolution Tuesday.

October 12th marks a year since Council member Joel Burns made a tearful presentation before the council on the effects of bullying in his life. His comments followed several recent suicides of teenagers who had been bullied at school. And the comments went "viral", landing Burns on Oprah and at a White House summit on bullying.