budget | KERA News

budget

Updated at 2:21 p.m. ET

President Trump signed a massive spending bill Friday, hours after threatening a veto that would have triggered a government shutdown.

Updated at 12:55 a.m. ET Friday

The Senate voted early Friday to pass a roughly $1.3 trillion spending bill to fund the government through Sept. 3. The move avoided a government shutdown.

From Texas Standard.

After a long night in Congress – propelled by an hours-long objection from Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky)– lawmakers passed a budget measure to avert another government shutdown. Texas Sen. John Cornyn called Paul’s blockade “irresponsible.”

Sean Theriault, a professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas, says that Thursday night was typical behavior from Rand Paul, particularly because he’s known as a deficit hawk.

Updated at 9:07 a.m. ET

President Trump signed a bipartisan budget agreement Friday morning, following approval of the bill in Congress shortly before sunrise.

The two-year spending pact will let lawmakers spend $300 billion more than current law allows.

The deal suspends a 2011 budget law championed by conservatives that set hard caps on discretionary spending and included an automatic trigger known as "sequester" cuts if Congress attempted to bust those spending caps.

In a rare show of congressional cooperation, Republican and Democratic leaders in the Senate announced a two-year budget deal Wednesday that would increase federal spending for defense as well as key domestic priorities, including many health programs.

Updated at 4:52 p.m. ET

Senate leaders reached a bipartisan budget agreement to increase military and domestic spending levels for two years, paving the way for the first long-term spending pact since President Trump took office.

The White House and House Speaker Paul Ryan quickly declared support for the pact, helping pave the way for its passage by the end of the week, despite opposition from fiscal hawks and liberal Democrats.

From Texas Standard.

Despite an economy that is reportedly continuing to grow, the state’s budget chief is looking ahead to the next legislative session and warning lawmakers that some bills with hefty price tags are set to come due – and that revenue will be tight.

Graphic by Todd Wiseman

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed the state’s two-year budget Monday, giving his approval to the $217 billion document crafted by the Legislature.

The Texas Tribune

Both chambers of the Texas Legislature voted Saturday evening to approve a $217 billion, two-year budget that would boost funding for the state's beleaguered child welfare agency, increase the number of state troopers on the Texas-Mexico border and avoid serious reforms to the state's much-criticized school finance system. 

From Texas Standard:

"Dead on arrival" is how Texas senior senator, Republican John Cornyn, characterized the formal budget plan unveiled by President Trump. It puts 66 programs on the chopping block, and includes a 31 percent cut to the Environmental Protection Agency, a 30 percent cut for the State Department and 20 percent from the Department of Agriculture.

Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

After months of private squabbling and public threats of a legislative overtime session, the Texas House and Senate finally compromised to unveil a joint budget late Saturday.

Updated 2:10 p.m. ET

The Senate approved the bipartisan $1.1 trillion spending bill that funnels money to nearly every corner of the federal government and keeps it running through the end of the current fiscal year in September. The House approved the measure on Wednesday, and it now goes to President Trump for his signature.

From Texas Standard:

As the legislative session heads into its final six weeks, lawmakers have a lot left to do. They face the task of reconciling budgets passed by the House and Senate into a single document. They must act on the governor’s emergency agenda items. And they’ll need to decide the fate of the more than 6,000 bills filed during the session.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

A program to rehabilitate victims of sex trafficking may finally receive funding under a proposal added to the Texas House budget late last week.

Texas House Passes Budget After More Than 15 Hour-Debate

Apr 7, 2017
Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

After 15 and a half hours of debate on hundreds of amendments to the Texas House budget, lawmakers in the lower chamber passed the two-year, $218 billion document, with 131 votes in favor and 16 votes against.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Just one day after the Texas Senate passed its two-year budget, a key House committee sent their own spending proposal to the full House – but not before cutting $2.4 billion from the state’s largest health care program for the poor and disabled.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Facing sluggish economic forecasts amid low oil prices along with billions in tax revenue already dedicated to the state highway fund, Comptroller Glenn Hegar announced Monday that lawmakers will have $104.87 billion in state funds at their disposal in crafting the next two-year budget, a 2.7 percent decrease from his estimate ahead of the legislative session two years ago.

Billions In Pension Shortfalls Threatening Texas Cities' Budgets

Dec 2, 2016
Illustration by Todd Wiseman / Vittorio Ferrari / Texas Tribune

The state’s largest cities face tens of billions of dollars in unfunded liabilities to employee pension funds, a series of separate financial situations that is spurring massive account withdrawals, ongoing lawsuits, mounting political friction and national media attention.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

For many people, the holidays mean hitting the stores, scouring the internet and for some of us, setting a budget. With that pressure to buy comes stress for folks living on the financial edge. According to WalletHub, one-third of Americans have already overspent.

As part of KERA’s series One Crisis Away at the Holidays, we meet two shoppers making tough decisions at the register.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Landing a good job is especially tough with a newborn to care for. When you're a teen mom, it's more complicated still. That’s where a Dallas non-profit called Alley’s House finds its mission.

Texas Tribune

After a marathon 17-hour debate, the Texas House gave tentative approval to its version of a new state budget this morning.

Texas Tribune executive editor Ross Ramsey tells KERA’s Sam Baker the $210-billion budget reflects a lot of Gov. Greg Abbott’s priorities.

KERA News

A.C. Gonzalez is six months into his job as Dallas' city manager, and Tuesday, he’ll present his first official budget to the city council. It includes a $5 million cut in police funding -- meaning 35 fewer officers -- and more money for libraries and animal services. Gonzalez sat down with KERA a day before his big reveal.

Flickr

Sen. John Cornyn on Wednesday expressed confidence he’ll be the Republican Party’s nominee despite a last-minute challenge by Congressman Steve Stockman. 

shutterstock.com

The two-year state budget deal that appears to be coming together in Austin would restore $3.93 billion of the $5.4 billion in public education money cut last session. 

It would also take $2 billion in Rainy Day savings money to create a loan fund to build water projects. 

It’s unclear whether another proposed loan fund of up to $2.7 billion to build new roads will be part of the new budget.  

Lockheed Martin

Texas agencies and programs that receive federal money are bracing for the automatic budget cuts that could begin Friday.

A White House analysis of how the so-called sequestration would affect each state indicates education, defense, and public health programs would be hit the hardest.

Marlith

Four schools in North Texas went into lockdown Tuesday morning for various reasons. Campus security officials are on heightened alert after last week’s school shooting in Connecticut.

Thomas Fowler / (cc) flickr

Fort Worth is scaling back its pension plan for employees. The city’s bill for future retirees is outpacing the pension fund budget by about half-a-billion dollars.

KERA News

The Dallas School Board unanimously approved a $1.16 billion budget for next year, smaller than this year’s amount because of state funding cuts. Trustees also plan on giving teachers a raise, but not for another year.

Despite the DISD’s billion dollar plus budget, Dallas and nearly every district in Texas say it’s been a tough year financially. That’s because the state cut education dollars by $5.4 billion last year. So Dallas’s 2012-2013 budget is $23 million smaller than the year just ended.

The Dallas budget shortfall is shrinking, from $40 million last month to $24 million.

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