Brexit | KERA News

Brexit

Britain's prime minister said Tuesday that the United Kingdom will walk away from the European Union's single market and unified court system, making a sharp break with its largest trading partner.

In a speech delivered about six months after voters passed a referendum requiring Britain to leave the EU, Prime Minister Theresa May laid out a plan for what that split would look like, emphasizing limits on migration into the country.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

In a break with diplomatic protocol, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has recommended that pro-Brexit politician Nigel Farage become the United Kingdom's ambassador in Washington, D.C.

In a tweet Monday night, Trump said: "Many people would like to see @Nigel_Farage represent Great Britain as their Ambassador to the United States. He would do a great job!"

One of two candidates to become the U.K.'s next prime minister has withdrawn from the race, leaving Theresa May in line to be the country's next leader.

Andrea Leadsom announced Monday she is backing out of the contest, citing the strong support for her opponent May and saying it was in Britain's best interests for the next leader to be put in place quickly.

Rick Holter/KERA News

A week ago, British voters shocked the world when they voted to pull Britain out of the European Union. One of the clearest voices against what's known as "Brexit" visited North Texas this week.

The decision is made and now comes the long and complicated job of decoupling the U.K. from the European Union. On paper, there is a tangled legal process, but it has never been tested and leaves some issues unaddressed.

Donald Trump celebrated voters' stunning decision in the United Kingdom to leave the European Union, while he marked the re-opening of his golf course and resort in Scotland.

Trump contended that the U.K. had "taken back their independence" and predicted similar populist, nativist movements throughout the Western world, like the one fueling his candidacy in the U.S.

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Britain will vote on Thursday whether to stay or leave the European Union. The fallout from that vote could have major implications elsewhere. UT Dallas professor Harold Clarke studies British politics and economics, and he explains what a ‘Brexit’ vote would mean for Texas.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Five stories that have North Texas talking: The president of the Texas Nationalist Movement sees Britain’s possible move from the EU as a model; Arlington police might be over-reporting traffic stops to meet quotas; two goats were shot and killed on the Waco property featured on HGTV’s “Fixer Upper” ; and more.