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Breast Health Center

A new state law this year requires commercial insurers to cover 3D mammograms, a more advanced — and expensive — form of screening for breast cancer than the standard 2D version.

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While breast cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death among women, the American Cancer Society recently reported death rates from the disease declined nearly 40 percent between 1989 and 2015.

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A new study has found longer survival rates for women with Stage 4 breast cancer, the most severe form. 

Courtesy of Baylor, Scott & White Health

For a parent, battling cancer is tough enough. Having to explain it to your kids can be a whole other challenge. That's why Baylor Scott & White Health has created a program that helps terminally ill parents talk to their young children about disease, treatment and death. A Dallas mother turned to Baylor specialists for help telling her son she had breast cancer.

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After a mammogram, no one wants to hear the words, “We found a spot on the image.” But it can be a problem for women with high density breast tissue – and it may or may not have to do with breast cancer. 

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For months now, there’s been debate in the medical community about mammograms. When to start getting them? How often? How effective are they even?

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In this edition of our consumer health series, Vital Signs - the most aggressive form of breast cancer.

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A study out of Britain offers a new way to measure chances of developing breast cancer: skirt size.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Diane never thought about getting a tattoo. Or plastic surgery.

But this year, after a double mastectomy, she did both.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Mental health issues can leave people feeling isolated and ashamed. To counter misconceptions about mental illness and help connect people with resources, the Texas Department of State Health Services is launching Speak Your Mind Texas, a conversation about mental health traveling to cities across the state.

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In today's Morning Edition local block from the KERA Newsroom: Addison is home to the largest breast imaging company in the U.S. Even they have trouble convincing women to go in for regular mammograms. Lauren Silverman reports how Solis Women’s Health is trying to make the experience more comfortable.  And the pricetag on a high-concept graphic novel by one North Texas artist: $15,000. Dallas Art Fair co-founder Chris Byrne reveals the secrets of his magician protagonist in an interview with Jerome Weeks.

Solis Women’s Health Mammography

Breast imaging is a multi-billion dollar industry. And in spite of concerns over when, and whether, to begin breast cancer screening, every year nearly 40 million mammograms are done in the U.S. The largest breast imaging company in the country is based in North Texas, and it’s modernized its approach to generating, and keeping up with demand.

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A study published in February of 90,000 women over 25 questions the value of mammography in detecting breast cancer. Among the findings:

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Numerous stories on the subject mostly focus on women. Men also get breast cancer, but their lack of awareness about that often has serious consequences. Dr. Roshni Rao of UT Southwestern Medical Center talked (with KERA’s Sam Baker) about male breast cancer in this installment of Vital Signs.

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Before Angelina Jolie told the world about her decision to have a double mastectomy, you might not have heard of BRCA1 or BRCA2. These are two genes where mutations are known to increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer. Jolie’s health risk was raised because of a mutation of the BRCA1 gene.  

Scientists say we need to look beyond BRCA – to other genes that also increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer. KERA’s Lauren Silverman talks with Linda Robinson, assistant director of the Cancer Genetics Program at UT Southwestern about the future of genetic testing for breast cancer. 

We already know that black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than their white peers, but a new study could explain why. Research shows one in five black women with breast cancer have a genetic mutation tied to the disease.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

North Texas women are grateful Angelina Jolie shone a light on genetic cancer risk and now they hope local ladies will tap into that knowledge.

The Dallas area chapter of the group FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered) meets tonight a 6 p.m. at Medical City in Suite A100. The meeting is completely open, so anyone with questions is encouraged to attend.

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North Texas hospitals are already doing the kind of genetic testing Angelina Jolie is bringing to light in a very personal New York Times editorial.

Jolie revealed that she got a double mastectomy earlier this year as a preventative measure. She has a mutation in her BRCA1 gene that makes her breast cancer risk over 80 percent and her chance of ovarian cancer about 50/50.

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Who says you can’t have fun and a get a mammogram? This week is National Women’s Health Week, and you can celebrate here in North Texas a few ways:

Breast Cancer In Young Women Rising

Feb 27, 2013
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Young women are much less likely than older women to be diagnosed with breast cancer -- but research showing a tripling of advanced breast cancer cases in women under forty is for some doctors, a disturbing trend. 

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When you go in for a mammogram, you now have a choice to make. Approved last year by the Food and Drug Administration, a 3-D mammogram is touted as a more accurate check for breast cancer. But it’s also more expensive. In a KERA Health Checkup, Dr. Jim Schroeder, a radiologist at Lake Pointe Breast Center in Rockwall, compares the two choices – beginning with the usual mammogram.

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The Susan G. Komen for the Cure breast-cancer charity on Friday abandoned plans to eliminate grants to Planned Parenthood. The startling decision came after three days of virulent criticism that resounded across the Internet, jeopardizing Komen's iconic image.

"We want to apologize to the American public for recent decisions that cast doubt upon our commitment to our mission of saving women's lives," a Komen statement said.