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Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is considering alternative ways to pay for the border wall, backtracking on the president's oft-repeated promise that Mexico would foot the bill.

A White House spokesman said one idea taking shape is to apply a 20 percent tax on imports from Mexico, as well as other countries with which the U.S. has a trade deficit. That would effectively saddle U.S. consumers with a significant portion of the wall's cost, estimated at $15 billion or more.

Mexicans have reacted angrily to President Trump's executive order, which among many things directed the U.S. government to begin immediate construction of a border wall.

Mexican lawmakers are urging President Enrique Peña Nieto to cancel his scheduled visit to Washington, D.C., on Jan. 31.

Peña Nieto has not said whether he will cancel the meeting.

The Logistics of Building Trump's Border Wall

Jan 25, 2017

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday authorizing the building of a wall along the United States-Mexico border.

He told ABC News that morning that the U.S. will start building the wall “as soon as we can. As soon as we can physically do it. … I would say in months. Certainly, planning is starting immediately.”

From the start of his campaign, after he descended the golden escalator to give his announcement speech, Donald Trump promised to build a wall along the U.S.' Southern border. Now, Trump is taking the first steps toward keeping that promise, with an executive action that calls for building that wall.

In line with his campaign theme of tightening laws on immigration, that action will call for other measures, such as hiring more Border Patrol agents and expanding detention space.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Courtesy Michael Seifert

It’s just before the holidays in McAllen, a town of 130,000 on the U.S.-Mexico border. Basilisa Valdez sits in the kitchen at her sister’s house, waiting for relatives to arrive. Here, that means some come from across town, and some from Reynosa, just across the river in Mexico.

Click here to experience "The Wall: A Special Report from Texas Standard"

 The Texas Standard gets a lot of emails: story ideas, feedback - sometimes good, sometimes different. On occasion, we get a call to action.

Sherry V. Smith / Shutterstock

Forget Donald Trump's Great Wall.

The people who live in the bustling, fertile Rio Grande Valley, where the U.S. border meets the Gulf of Mexico, think a "virtual wall" of surveillance technology makes a lot more sense. It's already in wide use and expanding.

Todd Wiseman / The Texas Tribune

Reporters at the Texas Tribune are exploring border security and immigration -- two topics that affect nearly every part of Texas.  Jay Root is a reporter with the Texas Tribune and has reported several stories in the project, called Bordering on Insecurity.

Border Residents Weigh In On Walls And Community

Jul 20, 2016
Shutterstock

One of the pillars of Donald Trump’s campaign has been his promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. This idea has resonated with many Americans. Today on Think, journalist Alfredo Corchado told Krys Boyd about a recent poll of border residents that measured how they feel about the idea of a wall.

Shutterstock

A border wall between the U.S.-Mexico border has been a major focus of Donald Trump’s campaign. However, a new poll suggests people living in border cities oppose that idea.

Texas Explores Flexing Legal Muscles On Immigration

Dec 17, 2015
Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Crafted carefully, state laws can be written that would allow Texas to crack down on undocumented immigrants and illegal border crossers without running afoul of the U.S. Constitution, a state attorney told lawmakers recently.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Tuesday extended the deployment of National Guard troops at the Mexico border due to a spike in the number of unaccompanied minors entering the country.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Gov. Abbott approves $800 million border security bill; the McKinney police officer has resigned following the viral video; Dallas and Fort Worth mayors are in Europe; and more.  

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

About half a million Texans live in what’s known as colonias. These communities pop up near the Texas-Mexico border and usually lack the basics, such paved roads, utilities and secure housing.

Texas Tribune

After a marathon 17-hour debate, the Texas House gave tentative approval to its version of a new state budget this morning.

Texas Tribune executive editor Ross Ramsey tells KERA’s Sam Baker the $210-billion budget reflects a lot of Gov. Greg Abbott’s priorities.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Five stories that have North Texas talking: the Susan Hawk DA fallout continues; Fort Worth clears out a homeless camp; the Texas music bucket list; and more.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott stopped in Dallas Monday after an ice storm kept him away earlier this month. With his first legislative session almost at its midpoint, the governor talked about his priorities, his experience and progress so far.

House Speaker Straus Opposes Long-Term Deployment Of Guard At Border

Feb 18, 2015
Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

A day after Gov. Greg Abbott backed extending the Texas National Guard’s stay at the Mexico border, House Speaker Joe Straus said Wednesday that he will work to make that happen but that he remained opposed to a "long-term deployment."

Border Apprehensions In Texas Spiked In 2014

Dec 22, 2014
Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Federal immigration agents apprehended nearly 97,000 more people trying to enter the U.S. illegally through Texas’ southern border during the 2014 fiscal year than they did in 2013, the Department of Homeland Security announced on Friday.

Texas Lawmakers Approve $86 Million For Border Surge

Dec 1, 2014
Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

The state-funded buildup of law enforcement at the Texas border will continue into next year, as officials Monday approved another $86 million to keep the operation afloat.

Texas Army National Guard

This week, KERA, The Dallas Morning News and KXAS-TV (NBC 5) are producing a series of coordinated reports we’re calling Five Days in October. Each day we’re looking at where the leading candidates for governor stand on a specific issue. Today, we look at border security and how Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis differ on deploying National Guard troops along the border.

Jennifer Whitney/Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Sen. Leticia Van de Putte says her Republican opponent for lieutenant governor is fear-mongering with his first fall television ad released this week.

The ad links the threat of an ISIS invasion to the candidates' dueling policies over immigration.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Tonight, the eyes of the Texas will be on the Rio Grande Valley when gubernatorial candidates Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott meet in Edinburg for their first televised debate. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

In Austin, Governor Rick Perry announced his plan to send a thousand members of the Texas National Guard to the border.   

“I will not stand idly by while our citizens are under assault, and little children from Central America are detained in squalor.”

Perry said the troops would help take the pressure off the Border Patrol.

“These additional resources will help combat the brutal Mexican drug cartels that are preying upon our communities and also will help to tear others, before they have a chance to harm our citizens and become criminal aliens within our borders.”

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / The Texas Tribune

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Gov. Rick Perry is expected to make an announcement about border security this afternoon,  a Texan was one of two Americans killed in Gaza fighting over the weekend, it’s been 45 years since the first sighting of the “Lake Worth Monster,” and more.

stateimpact.npr.org

The candidates for lieutenant governor have, not surprisingly, staked out opposing positions on a proposal that would speed the return of migrant children to their Central American countries.

ABC News

Gov. Rick Perry has accepted President Barack Obama's offer to discuss the immigration crisis with faith leaders and local officials in Dallas.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County Commissioners will meet Tuesday morning as controversy builds over County Judge Clay Jenkins' recent announcement that the county would help the federal government set up centers for 2,000 immigrant children. The lone Republican county commissioner, Mike Cantrell, doesn’t think Jenkins’ idea is a good one.

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