* | KERA News

*

The Case For Universal Basic Income

Aug 8, 2016
Shutterstock

Today Donald Trump laid out his economic plan, and later this week Hillary Clinton will do the same. They’ve got different ideas about how to help American workers, yet there’s one idea neither of them has mentioned to date – a universal basic income. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked about the idea with Andy Stern, a senior fellow at Columbia University. He’s the author of "Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream."

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

For the 20th year in a row, Dallas held its Mayor’s Back to School Fair today. The event at Fair Park is for low-income families who can get free school supplies and health screenings. It can really make a difference.  

A Conservative Solution To Climate Change

Aug 4, 2016
Shutterstock

Traditionally political progressives have taken the lead to minimize climate change. And they may soon gain some unlikely allies. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke to former U.S. Rep. Bob Inglis – a republican from South Carolina – about developing a market-based approach to fighting global warming.

The History Of Zika

Aug 3, 2016
Shutterstock

Media accounts of  Zika, Ebola and SARS sometimes give the impression that they are new viruses, when in fact evidence suggests they’ve  been around for a long time in their natural hosts — animals. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke to Jonna Mazet, a University of California - Davis epidemiology professor, about the spread of Zika and other infectious diseases. Mazet is featured in the PBS documentary “Spillover: Zika, Ebola and Beyond,” which airs tonight at 9 on KERA TV.

How Body Cameras Will Change Policing

Aug 2, 2016
Shutterstock

Last year the Dallas Police Department signed a $3.7 million contract with a technology company called Axon to purchase cloud storage for video shot on police body cameras. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with journalist Karen Weise about how Axon and body cameras will affect how police officers do their jobs. Her cover story, “Can CopCams Make Better Cops?” appears in a recent issue of Bloomberg Business Week magazine. 

Dane Walters / KERA News

Adrian Hall is a legend in American theater, having run two major companies at once: the Dallas Theater Center and the Trinity Rep in Rhode Island, which won the regional Tony Award in 1981.

Briscoe Center for American History

On Monday, the University of Texas marks 50 years since sniper Charles Whitman gunned down 16 people before police killed him. Thirty-two others were hurt.

The Path For Clinton

Jul 28, 2016
Shutterstock

Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for president tonight at the Democratic National Convention. Today on Think, Krys Boyd hosted a two-hour special on Hillary Clinton and the DNC. The episode featured a report from NPR’s Sam Sanders, a look at Clinton's background and a panel of political scientists discussing the convention so far. 

Thoughts On Trails - And How They're Made

Jul 25, 2016
Shutterstock

If you live in North Texas, you’ve probably taken a stroll down the Katy Trail or spent the morning hiking at Cedar Ridge Preserve. Ever wonder, though, how these things got there? Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Robert Moor, author of “On Trails: An Exploration,” about the role people play in forming new paths

Shutterstock

A recently-published study shows some weight loss medications actually do help, but they’re not cures. An expert in non-surgical weight loss at UT Southwestern Medical Center says users of the drugs need to be clear about what they’re taking.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It’s been a bumpy week for Dallas based southwest Airlines. This week, a computer outage took down its website, forcing 1,300 flight cancellations, and stranding passengers and crews. Then, despite a record second quarter profit, its stock price fell. Today, hundreds of union members picketed at Love Field over stalled contract talks.  

North Texas Teen Gets A Shot At Broadway

Jul 22, 2016
Chelsea Mayo

Chelsea Mayo of Farmers Branch has never been to New York City before. And that’s not her only first this weekend: she’s never been on a plane either.

Border Residents Weigh In On Walls And Community

Jul 20, 2016
Shutterstock

One of the pillars of Donald Trump’s campaign has been his promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. This idea has resonated with many Americans. Today on Think, journalist Alfredo Corchado told Krys Boyd about a recent poll of border residents that measured how they feel about the idea of a wall.

National Institutes of Health / Kuhn and Rossmann research groups, Purdue University

The news about the Zika virus has accelerated this week. A newborn in the Houston area tested positive for Zika-related microcephaly. Doctors are also trying to figure out how an elderly Utah man was infected without transmission through sex or mosquito bites. These developments come as a new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center finds that Zika can infect brain cells and hide itself from the immune system.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Simply re-arranging food pantry shelves is helping low income families make healthier choices. It's the same philosophy supermarkets employ-- called nudging-- when the store creates a special display to feature a product.

One North Texas pantry has had luck pushing brown rice, and whole wheat pasta.

Four Ways Americans Can Unite In Spite Of Recent Violence

Jul 18, 2016
Shutterstock

Violence across the country this summer — in Orlando, Dallas and Baton Rouge – along with videos of shootings of civilians by police has many Americans on edge. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Washington University associate law professor John Inazu about ways to bridge the current divides within American society. John Inazu is the author of, “Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference.”

A Baltimore judge has found Lt. Brian Rice, the fourth of six Baltimore police officers to go on trial in the death of Freddie Gray last year, not guilty of involuntary manslaughter. That's the most serious charge Rice had faced; he was also cleared of lesser charges.

The Islamic State group says one of its "soldiers" mowed down a crowd celebrating Bastille Day Thursday night on the promenade in Nice, France, killing at least 84 people.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Sedrick Huckaby paints portraits of people, often his own family members. And for more than a decade now, many of the portraits he’s painted happen to be of quilts. Old-fashioned, family-sewn quilts, the kind made from bright scraps and strips of color, whatever fabric leftovers were at hand.

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

President Obama was in Dallas Tuesday to speak at the interfaith memorial service for the five police officers who were killed in downtown last week.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The parents of Dallas shooter Micah Johnson say they are surprised by his violent rampage and note he returned from an Army deployment to Afghanistan a changed man.

Welcome to the Art&Seek Artist Spotlight. Every Thursday we’ll explore the personal journey of a different North Texas creative.  As it grows, artandseek.org/spotlight should ultimately paint a collective portrait of our artistic community. Enjoy, and let us know what you think.

Black Gun Owners In Texas Decry Racial Bias

Jul 10, 2016
Todd Wiseman/Randall Pugh / Texas Tribune illustration

Mark Hughes, wearing a camouflage shirt and legally, openly carrying an AR-15 rifle, was among dozens of black people in downtown Dallas on Thursday evening who were peacefully protesting against the recent back-to-back officer-involved killings of two black men.

Shutterstock

Fever, sneezing, a rash are obvious signals something may be physically wrong. But the body also sends “silent” signs you may ignore - signs of something far more serious. Here are six of them, according to Dr. Sentayehu Kassa, lead staff physician at Parkland Hospital's Vickery Health Center. 

Chick-fil-A / Facebook

Five stories that have North Texas talking: A Lake Jackson native ate Chick-fil-A regularly and lost 140 pounds; A Dallas woman won The Price Is Right; TCU researchers hope to save the bats; and more.

axbecerra / Flickr

Does geography actually matter when it comes to getting that first job?

A new Wallethub study ranks the best and worst cities for starting a career, and Texas is all over the top 25. Analyst Jill Gonzalez breaks down the rankings with KERA's Courtney Collins.

An Alzheimer's Researcher On How To Curb The Disease

Jun 28, 2016
Shutterstock

Anyone who makes it into old age will have a brain that shows some signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Some people suffer symptoms, though, while others don’t. Today on Think, Lauren Silverman spoke with David Bennett, director of the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, about new research into how we can keep our minds sharp and avoid dementia.

KERA News

KERA won five awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. -- the station's best-ever performance in public radio's premiere national contest. The station also took home four Lone Star Awards from the Houston Press Club.

That brings KERA's award count for this year to 29 -- another record.

Millennials Are Not Keeping The Faith

Jun 27, 2016
Shutterstock

Young people in America have more freedom to find a religion that suits them than ever before. At the same time, more than one-third of people in their 20s and 30s identify as not being religious. Yesterday on Think, told Lauren Silverman talked with Emma Green, who writes about religion for The Atlantic, about how millennials navigate their spiritual lives.  

In Cardiology, It's Still A Man's World

Jun 24, 2016
Shutterstock

Half of all medical students in the U.S. are women. But there’s one specialty they rarely go into: cardiology. Yesterday on Think, told Lauren Silverman talked with a panel of women heart doctors about why there are so few female cardiologist, how that affects patient care and what can be done to even out the numbers.

Pages