Autism | KERA News

Autism

How Autism Diagnostics Overlook Girls

Mar 24, 2016

One in 68 kids in the U.S. is affected by autism, with boys receiving four times as many diagnoses as girls. New research suggests that that disparity may be the result of girls on the spectrum getting overlooked and misdiagnosed.  

Center for BrainHealth

This week, the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas is starting construction on a new institute – and it’s shaped like a brain.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

John Rodakis wasn't looking to launch an investigation into autism.

But that's what happened after the Dallas man began a quest to understand why his son's autism symptoms changed dramatically while taking an antibiotic for strep throat.

Brinker International

Chili's has canceled a fundraiser for a group that states on its website that autism can be triggered by vaccinations, a position that has been widely discredited by the medical community.

Chili’s, which is part of Dallas-based Brinker International, had planned on donating a portion of its sales on Monday to the National Autism Association. On its website, the Massachusetts-based group says it believes that vaccinations can "trigger or exacerbate autism in some, if not many, children."

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History has a new learning space, where kids get some unusual playmates: scientists and researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

When kids with autism, Asperger’s and Down syndrome get too old for high school, the next big challenge is how to build an independent life. That’s what the Plano non-profit My Possibilities specializes in. The center is taking an artful approach.

Luciana Christante / Flickr

When it comes to medical advice, most people turn to their doctor. But in some places, it’s the religious leader whose words resonate. In one North Texas community, parishioners followed guidance from pastors who said to turn to faith before medicine. And this month, more than twenty of them became sick with the measles.

Lauren Silverman

The job hunt is complicated enough for most high school and college graduates. But for the growing number of young people on the autism spectrum, it is a daunting challenge. Nationwide 90 percent of adults with autism are either unemployed or underemployed. Despite the obstacles these people face trying to find work, there's a natural landing place: the tech industry.

Amelia Schabel graduated from high school five years ago. She had good grades and enrolled in community college. But it was too stressful. After less than a month she was back at home, doing nothing.