American Graduate: Education | KERA News

American Graduate: Education

Sierra Mickell studies at McKinney North High School
Credit Lara Solt

KERA's ongoing American Graduate initiative charts the journey from childhood to graduation. It’s part of the national public broadcasting project American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen. This multiyear initiative is playing out on all of KERA’s platforms, with news stories and community outreach through radio, television, web sites, social media and events. Some highlights:

In-Depth Multimedia Projects: What’s Next For The Class Of 17?, a look at junior-year decision time for the students we’ve been following since eighth grade; Homeless in High School, about how schools and kids deal with homelessness; and Generation One, which dug into the first-generation Texans who are reshaping schools.

Stories of Champions: Nashwa Zafar, UT-Arlington Muslim student; Esther Martinez, Irving elementary teacher who makes home visits to every student’s parents; Marcelo Cavazos of Arlington, named Texas Superintendent of the Year; Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer in Carrollton; and Kecia Dennis, a middle school teacher in North Richland Hills.

Support for KERA’s American Graduate initiative is made possible in part by:

The Secret To Raising Smart Kids

Sep 15, 2016
Shutterstock

There’s plenty of advice out there for parents on how to raise smart kids. What works, though, is still a question researchers are trying to answer.

andem / flickr

In recent weeks, several North Texas school districts have held or considered having tax ratification elections.

Gay and Lesbian Alliance

Transgender issues have dominated headlines recently. In particular, students. That leaves educators scrambling for information on the best ways to help. In Collin County, educators showed up for a session on what it means to be transgender. And many of them were school counselors. 

Why A College Degree Might Not Be Best For Everyone

Aug 31, 2016
Shutterstock

College is usually seen as the best path to economic success. Today on Think, as a part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative – Krys Boyd talked with Katherine Newman, provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, about why the “college for all model” isn’t working for everyone. She is the co-author of, “Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the Twenty-First Century.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

We met Denzel Bailey, a UT-Arlington student, a year ago. He's a homeless student in college. He spent the summer with his grandparents in south Fort Worth. Bailey is entering his senior year – and trying to balance work and school, while hoping to find a place he can call home.

How To Talk To Kids About Racial Violence

Aug 26, 2016
Shutterstock

All week as North Texas students returned to school, we’ listened in on conversations about race with parents, teachers and students. On Think -- as part of KERA’s American Graduate series “The First Week” -- Krys Boyd spoke to a panel of child psychologists about ways to help young people process the racial violence that occurred across the country this summer.

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. Today, it's Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer who’s building relationships in the  Carrollton-Farmers Branch school district.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

It’s the first week of school in many districts across North Texas, and students are returning to the classroom after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In this series, The First Week, KERA's reporters are listening in on the conversations about race happening in and around North Texas schools. Today, what students are saying about the violence this summer: police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a gunman's July ambush that killed five law officers in downtown Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Pages