American Graduate: Education | KERA News

American Graduate: Education

Liberty High School in Frisco has grown rapidly and become more diverse since opening in 2006.
Credit Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

KERA's ongoing American Graduate initiative charts the journey from childhood to graduation. It’s part of the national public broadcasting project American Graduate: Let’s Make It HappenThis multi-year initiative is playing out on all of KERA’s platforms, with news stories and community outreach through radio, television, websites, social media and events. 

Explore in-depth education projects: Race, Poverty and the Changing Face of Schools, a look at the changing demographics at four North Texas high schools; What’s Next For The Class Of 17?, stories about North Texas students from eighth grade to graduation; Homeless in High School, how schools and kids deal with homelessness; and Generation One, meet first-generation Texans who are reshaping schools.

Support for KERA’s American Graduate initiative is made possible in part by:

The Secret To Raising Smart Kids

Sep 15, 2016
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There’s plenty of advice out there for parents on how to raise smart kids. What works, though, is still a question researchers are trying to answer.

andem / flickr

In recent weeks, several North Texas school districts have held or considered having tax ratification elections.

Gay and Lesbian Alliance

Transgender issues have dominated headlines recently. In particular, students. That leaves educators scrambling for information on the best ways to help. In Collin County, educators showed up for a session on what it means to be transgender. And many of them were school counselors. 

Why A College Degree Might Not Be Best For Everyone

Aug 31, 2016
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College is usually seen as the best path to economic success. Today on Think, as a part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative – Krys Boyd talked with Katherine Newman, provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, about why the “college for all model” isn’t working for everyone. She is the co-author of, “Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the Twenty-First Century.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

We met Denzel Bailey, a UT-Arlington student, a year ago. He's a homeless student in college. He spent the summer with his grandparents in south Fort Worth. Bailey is entering his senior year – and trying to balance work and school, while hoping to find a place he can call home.

How To Talk To Kids About Racial Violence

Aug 26, 2016
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All week as North Texas students returned to school, we’ listened in on conversations about race with parents, teachers and students. On Think -- as part of KERA’s American Graduate series “The First Week” -- Krys Boyd spoke to a panel of child psychologists about ways to help young people process the racial violence that occurred across the country this summer.

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. Today, it's Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer who’s building relationships in the  Carrollton-Farmers Branch school district.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

It’s the first week of school in many districts across North Texas, and students are returning to the classroom after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In this series, The First Week, KERA's reporters are listening in on the conversations about race happening in and around North Texas schools. Today, what students are saying about the violence this summer: police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a gunman's July ambush that killed five law officers in downtown Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas school board Thursday night voted against putting a tax ratification election before voters this fall. 

Shutterstock

Hate tests? The Dallas school district has some good news for you. This summer, the district announced it’s going to nix one-third of its assessments. 

Dallas Independent School District

Nearly 94 percent of districts and around 88 percent of public schools in Texas have met minimum education standards in the final year before shifting to an A-F letter grade accountability system.

UNT Dallas College of Law

The University of North Texas at Dallas has been trying to build a different kind of law school -- one that’s more affordable and targets diverse and non-traditional students. 

Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University School of Law

Two North Texas universities recently decided to no longer enroll new students in their evening law school programs.

UNT Dallas

The UNT Dallas law school program is in jeopardy of not receiving accreditation from the American Bar Association. 

For a moment, let's pretend.

That everything you know about America's public education system — the bitter politics and arcane funding policies, the rules and countless reasons our schools work (or don't) the way they do — is suddenly negotiable.

Pretend the obstacles to change have melted like butter on hot blacktop.

Now ask yourself: What could — and should — we do differently?

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

For the 20th year in a row, Dallas held its Mayor’s Back to School Fair today. The event at Fair Park is for low-income families who can get free school supplies and health screenings. It can really make a difference.  

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Around the country, it’s been challenging for law school graduates to find jobs as lawyers. As a result, law school enrollment has gone down in some places. That’s not deterring one North Texas school. The UNT Dallas College of Law is trying to attract a different type of student.

San Francisco Unified School District

When school starts this fall, the two biggest systems in Texas will be led by Latinos. Last year, Dallas rehired Michael Hinojosa as superintendent. Today, Houston's board of trustees unanimously chose Richard Carranza as sole finalist for its top job.

Panel Backpedals On Swapping Out STAAR Tests

Jul 27, 2016
Qiling Wang / Texas Tribune

A special panel charged with suggesting changes to the state’s testing and school accountability system will recommend that state lawmakers implement a series of individualized, computer-based exams to measure student performance and progress throughout the year.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Hundreds of Texas teachers recently spent a couple days in summer school to learn the best ways to teach International Baccalaureate classes. The IB curriculum has been growing statewide because of its high global standards. Today we take a closer look at what sets it apart.

Oil Patch Schools Facing Budget Nightmare

Jul 19, 2016
Robin Jerstad / Texas Tribune

In December 2014, the week Pam Seipp became interim superintendent of Runge schools, the tiny South Texas district held a symbolic groundbreaking for schools and sports facilities to be paid for by a $22 million bond that local voters overwhelmingly approved just as oil prices began to slip.

Seipp’s main responsibility since then? “The bearer of bad news,” she says.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas’ Perot Museum of Nature and Science just launched its second TECH Truck. Designed to take science to the streets, the truck recently visited southern Dallas on the campus of UNT Dallas.  

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

It’s summer, but that doesn’t mean kids are off the hook from learning. One Dallas camp is teaching its students about character – and this week, the focus is on beauty. KERA News tagged along with one group as they trekked around the Trinity River Audubon Center.

Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says the Fort Worth school district’s guidelines for transgender students violate state law.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA

David Kapuku came to the U.S. with his family in 2013 after his mother won the Diversity Visa Lottery. KERA reporter Stella Chávez met David while reporting on immigrant students in North Texas for a series called “Generation One.” She recently caught up with David, who’s just graduated from high school. He talks about how the past few weeks have been filed with triumph and tragedy.

Photo: Nada Atieh

When school's out, Texas schools are giving low-income kids free meals in the summer. The problem is five out of every six kids who are eligible don’t show up. However, the Arlington school district is trying to turn that around. 

Dustin Marshall won the district 2 trustee seat on the Dallas Independent School District school board Saturday over competitor Mita Havlick.

bill zeeble / KERA News

The Orlando shootings have brought another layer of pain to transgender kids and their families. We hear from several of them about how they’re coping - and how the rise of the Texas bathroom issue has complicated their lives.

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