American Graduate: Education

KERA's ongoing American Graduate initiative charts the journey from childhood to graduation. Scroll down to catch up on the latest education coverage from KERA.

Also, check out our special series, American Graduate: Generation One, about how schools are educating students who are immigrants or the children of immigrants. And, in American Graduate: Homeless In High School, meet some of the 110,000 homeless students who attend Texas public schools. 

Burlingham / Shutterstock

Early voting ends May 3 for a number of North Texas school board and bond elections. Here's a look at some of the items on the ballot.

Sara Ortega / Uplift Education

Many people were shocked to hear in February that kids from a Dallas charter school endured racial insults during their trip to Texas A&M in College Station. More dramatic stories came out during a symposium on Friday sponsored by the Uplift charter school chain.

As College Costs Rise, Texas Schools Open Food Pantries For Students

Apr 20, 2016
Jerod Foster / Texas Tribune

The stereotype is so old that it’s enmeshed in popular culture: College students arrive on campus to find a surplus of food — enough for food fights in dining halls or to pack on the infamous “freshman 15.” 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

On May 7, McKinney voters will head to the polls to decide on a $220 million school district bond package. It includes plans for school upgrades, new technology and a 12,000-seat stadium and event center.

Let's begin with a choice.

Say there's a check in the mail. It's meant to help you run your household. You can use it to keep the lights on, the water running and food on the table. Would you rather that check be for $9,794 or $28,639?

It's not a trick question. It's the story of America's schools in two numbers.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Last fall, KERA reported on a new scholarship program at the University of Texas at Dallas. Students could win up to $5,000 solving challenges in a computer game similar to Minecraft. Meet some of the winners.

How UT-Dallas Transformed Itself Into A Top Texas College

Apr 11, 2016
Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Longtime University of Texas at Dallas administrator Hobson Wildenthal has fretted for years that his university doesn’t get the credit it deserves. That’s why he was so happy last year after meeting a candidate for a tenure-track job.  

Blanscape / Shutterstock.com

The top 10 percent rule in Texas gives high-performing high school students automatic admission into the best public universities in the state. But that doesn’t always mean top students from low-income backgrounds will attend.

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock

In Dallas County, more than 30,000 eligible children are not enrolled in pre-K. The education nonprofit Commit and nine area school districts have teamed up this week to early register thousands of students for pre-K in the fall. Jaime Hanks Meyers is director of early education at Commit.

Bill Zeeble / KERA public radio

One major focus in the classroom is getting students ready for college or a career. These days, some of the hottest careers are in kitchens. One North Texas culinary college class is preparing future chefs.

Pages