allergies | KERA News

allergies

Eric Aasen / KERA News

A North Texas doctor helped spark an international discussion this week -- about peanut allergies. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

A tiny Texas-themed tick can make you allergic to meat. And one expert says it could be the most common tick in North Texas.

Talk about irony: In the land of barbecue and meat lovers, the pest is called the Lone Star tick. One bite can mean no more beef, lamb, pork and more for years.

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A recently-released study has eased fears about whether it’s safe for pregnant women to eat peanuts and tree nuts like walnuts, almonds and pecans. Dr. Sheri Puffer, an OB/GYN at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital, discusses the results with KERA’s Sam Baker in this installment of Vital Signs.

Boston Scientific

More than two million people in Texas have at some point been diagnosed with asthma. And for some of them, inhalers and medications aren’t enough to stay out of the hospital. In 2010, the FDA approved the first non-medical treatment for severe asthma that involves inserting a heated metal device into the lung to make breathing easier. About 1,000 people across the country – and dozens in Dallas – have had the procedure. Now it’s time to review.

Allergy shots have long been one of the best available treatments for hay fever, other allergies, and asthma, but they're a pain. In Europe, people have a more pleasant alternative: drops put under the tongue.

That treatment, called sublingual immunotherapy, hasn't been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but more and more patients in the U.S. are asking for it.