Vital Signs: Possible Help For Those With Type 2 Diabetes? | KERA News

Vital Signs: Possible Help For Those With Type 2 Diabetes?

Mar 31, 2014

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have targeted another possible way to control high blood sugar for the 25 million Americans with Type 2 Diabetes. The discovery occurred amid research into people born without fat, and why such people develop health problems associated with fat such as diabetes.

In this edition of Vital Signs, Dr. Anil Agarwal, Professor of Internal Medicine, said the research led to phosphatidic acid that plays a role in hyperglycemia – blood glucose or sugar rising to above normal levels.

What Is Hyperglycemia?

The Mayo Clinic says Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body’s main energy source. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated with the treatment of diabetes. However, a variety of conditions, many of them rare, can cause low blood sugar in people without diabetes. Like fever, hypoglycemia isn’t a disease itself — it’s an indicator of a health problem.

Early signs and symptoms

Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for:

  • Frequent urination
  • Increased thirst
  • Blurred vision
  • Fatigue
  • Headache

Later signs and symptoms

If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include:

  • Fruity-smelling breath
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry mouth
  • Weakness
  • Confusion
  • Coma
  • Abdominal pain

Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if:

  • You’re sick and can’t keep any food or fluids down, and
  • Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) with ketones in your urine

Make an appointment with your doctor if:

  • You experience ongoing diarrhea or vomiting, but you’re able to take some foods or drinks
  • You have a fever that lasts more than 24 hours
  • Your blood glucose is more than 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) even though you’ve taken your diabetes medication
  • You have trouble keeping your blood glucose within the desired range

What is Type 2 Diabetes?

WebMD.com says Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes make insulin. But either their pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin well enough. This is called insulin resistance. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can’t get into the body’s cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body’s cells are not able to function properly.

Other problems associated with the buildup of glucose in the blood include:

  • Damage to the body. Over time, the high glucose levels in the blood can damage the nerves and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart and lead to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries that can cause heart attack and stroke.
  • Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination, causing dehydration.
  • Diabetic coma (hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma). When a person with type 2 diabetes becomes very ill or severely dehydrated and is not able to drink enough fluids to make up for the fluid losses, they may develop this life-threatening complication.