The High Five
10:09 am
Wed December 5, 2012

More Battles For The Boy Scouts

Five stories that have North Texas talking: 'Scout's Dishonor', a murder suspect recaptured, pink toys for mini-engineers and more.

Texas Monthly's Brian Sweany holds sacred his memories of making one-match fires as an Eagle Scout. But when the Boy Scouts reaffirmed their policy to refuse gay members, he decided he'd never condone the organization by signing his own son up for a troop.

Sweany is a former D Magazine staffer and now serves as senior executive editor of TM. He penned an op-ed for the December issue of the magazine called ‘Scout’s Dishonor’ explaining his decision. He’s on Think today at noon to talk with Krys Boyd about his views, and the challenges the Irving-based Boy Scouts have faced. The LA Times updated its investigation that showed decades-long patterns of sexual abuse this week.

Look back at a story by KERA's Bill Zeeble on ousted den mother Jennifer Tyrrell, who protested the Scouts' decision to kick her out because of her sexual orientation in Irving this summer.

  • After escaping Parkland Hospital for two and a half hours, the Irving man accused of murdering 16-year-old Shania Gray is back in custody. Investigators report Franklin Davis stole a deputy’s gun after overpowering him; the pistol has been recovered. [WFAA]
  • Engineering is not just a boy's domain, but we knew that already -- thanks in part to author and recent Think guest Sue V. Rosser, who says progress is being made to prove that point. One toy company is focusing on steering girls into the field when they’re at their tiniest and most impressionable. How? Pink. GoldieBlox could be an influential gift for toddlers this season. [Co.Exist]
  • Roger Staubach’s in the news, but not because of his sports or business exploits. The Cowboy legend’s daughter announced she’ll run for the City Council seat representing Preston Hollow. The District 13 member-elect will replace Ann Margolin.   [Dallas Morning News]
  • Want Mark Cuban to dissect your plans for a start-up and lend some pointers? It’ll cost you --  $166 per minute, in fact. He’s joined up with Clarity, a web app that links budding entrepreneurs with mentors. Some seasoned businessmen on the network don’t charge for their services; Cuban is not one of them. [Dallas Observer’s Unfair Park]