The High Five
1:34 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

List Of Arlington Heights' Famous Alumni Grows

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Something's in the water at a Fort Worth high school, Johnny Football's grandfather cheers him on at his East Texas restaurant and more.

What do Congressional freshmen Marc Veasey and Roger Williams have in common? Same thing John Denver, Betty Buckley and Delbert McClinton share -- a diploma from Fort Worth's Arlington Heights High School.

KERA's BJ Austin stumbled upon the connection while reporting on Fort Worth Democrat Veasey and Weatherford Republican Williams taking the oath as new representatives. And Arlington Heights isn't done churning out notable humans, apparently. This video promotes the school's career-driven Gold Seal Programs, narrated by the Star-Telegram's Bud Kennedy, who, by the way, also hails from the Heights.

  • Texas A&M football has been full of surprises this year, thanks to QB Johnny Manziel. The Heisman Trophy winner and AP Player of the Year has admirers in East Texas cheering for him ahead of the team's Cotton Bowl matchup with Oklahoma tonight. Jerry Loggins, Manziel's grandfather, runs Loggins Restaurant in Tyler. "I could tell real early on that he was going to have some extraordinary talent about him," Loggins raves to videographer Paul Moseley at the hopping townie joint. [Star-Telegram]
  • It was a rough week for DART commuters. But imagine how awful it must have been for the train operator on duty when a 20-year-old man stepped on to DART rail tracks at Southwestern Medical District/Parkland Station. When something that horrific happens, it's got to be brutal to be the person at the helm of the train. The New York Times talked to several Big Apple drivers about their experiences.  [NYT]
  • If you listened to WBAP anytime from 1981 to 2003, Dick Siegel and Hal Jay helped you get where you were going. Siegel, 73, beloved as a traffic reporter and also for those cheeky "Sam From Sales" comedy bits, died of a heart attack Thursday.  [WBAP]
  • Wait! Before you throw that Christmas tree on the curb, know this: You can infuse tea or beer with those pine needles. Yum. Evergreen. [NPR]