Sam Sanders | KERA News

Sam Sanders

As a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam Sanders is covering the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election. A mix of breaking news and feature reporting, his work is heard on NPR's flagship news programs and read on NPR.org. Sanders travels the country looking for the stories behind the horserace, catching trends before they're trends, and making politics relatable to people who might not actually like politics. He also cohosts NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point with Tom Ashbrook.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a Master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio Texas, with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, discusses the tortured genius of Kanye West, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush has endorsed Texas Senator Ted Cruz for president. The news is the latest indication that the Republican Party establishment might finally view Cruz as a viable alternative to Donald Trump

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

How many Donald Trump jokes can be made in one night? Let the Gridiron Club count the ways.

The D.C. journalism and political establishments gathered on Saturday night to make fun of themselves and an increasingly unpredictable presidential campaign at the Gridiron Club and Foundation's 131st Anniversary Spring Dinner.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And here with me in the studio is Rachel Martin, who you're used to hearing on Sunday mornings.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hi there.

SHAPIRO: So happy to have you here on Super Tuesday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

At this moment, Sen. Bernie Sanders is delivering a victory speech in Vermont, where he is projected to have won his home state primary. Let's listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

To understand how Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign is reacting to the candidate's gigantic loss in South Carolina's Democratic primary, it's important to understand how he reacted to another loss just a few weeks ago, in Iowa.

After disappointing finishes in presidential nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, Jeb Bush suspended his campaign for president Saturday night.

How many ways can The Internet mock Jeb Bush?

So many. So many ways. Here's the latest.

This past Sunday during 11 a.m. worship service at Bible Way Church of Atlas Road in Columbia, S.C., there was a short celebration of Black History Month. The church honored John Wesley Matthews Jr., a long-serving black state senator.

After Matthews accepted an award, the pastor of the church, Darrell Jackson Sr., took time to acknowledge another special guest.

After a razor-thin victory in the Iowa caucuses, and a double-digit loss to Bernie Sanders in the New Hampshire primary, Hillary Clinton is looking to South Carolina for a big win later this month. And she's counting on strong black support in that state to give her a definitive victory.

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