Ryan Poppe | KERA News

Ryan Poppe

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

It might be hard to believe, but Texas’s voting maps, those lines that decide where your representative district is and what seat you’re voting for, have been in flux for the past six years.

Public radio stations from across the state collaborated on this series looking at the death penalty in Texas – its history, how it’s changed, whom it affects and its future. The following story is from Texas Public Radio:

When you hear about the death penalty in Texas, the discussion often focuses on criminal proceedings or policy. Often overlooked – how the death penalty affects victim’s families – the people left struggling to find healing in the wake of violent crimes.

The Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund has filed a lawsuit challenging Bexar County’s use of outdated Voter ID signs in polling locations and use of election officials turning away eligible voters.

MALDEF alleges that Bexar County has posted and announced false and unauthorized voter ID requirements in early voting polling places throughout the county.   The group’s Nina Perales says they are asking a state judge to remove all illegal voter ID materials from polling locations as well as from the county’s website and voter hotline.

PHOTOS BY THE TEXAS TRIBUNE AND GAGE SKIDMORE

It’s no secret Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are two of the most disliked major party nominees to ever run for President. That has some Texans searching for other options…any options…when it comes to our next commander and chief. Austinite Kaia Tingley asked: “Can we vote for either Libertarian or Green Party candidates in Texas?”

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick says nearly 60,000 law enforcement officers are being outfitted with substandard equipment.  Patrick is pushing for an upgrade that he says will save police officers' lives.

Over the weekend a handful of elected-Texas Republicans announced they were no longer supporting Donald Trump as the GOP presidential candidate, some even asking that he step down.  But while others have scolded Trump for his “hot mic” comments about groping women, these same Texas elected officials have not denounced his candidacy.

With just few months before the start of the 2017 legislative session, Gov. Greg Abbott is promoting his plan to decrease abortions.  Abbott laid out a section of his legislative agenda at the annual Texas Alliance for Life benefit gala in Austin.

As part of the state’s ongoing border security operations, the Department of Public Safety plans to ask the legislature in 2017 for $1 billion.  It is a budget request that has some South Texas lawmakers still asking if the state’s efforts are effective and where is the money being spent?

 

An effort that would make it mandatory for all abortion providers to dispose of fetal tissue remains through either a burial or cremation service sparks heated testimony in Austin.  Those on both sides of the issue testified before the Texas Department of State Health Services Commission on how it would impact Texas women.

 

A non-binding legal opinion issued by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton states that Texas can withhold federal funding to nonprofit refugee resettlement groups if these groups ignore the state’s security verification program for Syrian and Iraqi refugees being sent to the state.  

Under a new policy change, transgender inmates in Texas prisons will be able to receive hormone therapy while behind bars.  It’s a move that advocates are calling a positive step, but far from ideal.


The State of Texas can no longer lay claim to the title of “State with the most gun sales.”  The latest numbers on firearm purchases even prompted Governor Greg Abbott to put out an online message that he was embarrassed by the news.

The figures are based off of the number of requests the FBI receives to conduct criminal background checks for new gun purchases.  Two years ago following the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, gun sales were at an all-time high in Texas.

On top of the hill overlooking the Hidden Pine Valley, an area just west of Smithville, are the charred remains of pine trees destroyed by the 2011 Labor Day wildfire that ravaged more than 34-thousand acres, destroyed over 16-hundred homes and took the lives of two people.

  Owners of deer breeding ranches throughout the Hill Country are now worried about how the disease may affect their $2 billion industry.

  Near Junction, a two-hour drive northwest of San Antonio is the Perfect 10 Whitetail Deer Ranch.  It’s a high-fenced facility that uses genetics to breed big bucks with giant antlers.  They’re sold to the hunting business for up to $30,000 a deer

UN Conspiracies, Communism and the Common Core: These were just some of the critiques brought up during the final public hearing over the revisions and adoption of the state’s 2015 social studies textbooks. 

Conservative activists, and some on the State Board of Education, did not react positively to certain revisions made to a selection of social studies textbooks up for adoption this week.

The U.S. Supreme Court is examining whether the Environmental Protection Agency overreached its authority with its regulations on cross-state pollution, but environmental groups in Texas say the EPA is simply operating within the confines of the Clean Air Act.


Texas gets a failing grade when it comes to passing gun legislation aimed at preventing violence, according a new study by two gun regulation groups.

A leading Democratic candidate for Wendy Davis’ Senate seat has indicated he will not be running in 2014, leaving the party with a smaller margin of error in the Texas Senate.

Some in the Texas Democratic Party believed Fort Worth City Councilman Joel Burns would be the person to take over in Davis’ district because he has bipartisan support, but this week Burns announced he would not be running in 2014.

Texas Education Commissioner Michael Williams has posted a draft of a how the curriculum standards will work with a new law creating multiple educational pathways for Texas students.

The new curriculum standards were created by House Bill 5 that passed during the 2013 regular session, it creates career-technical and college-ready pathways for students.  

The battle over how evolution will be presented for all public school students in Texas led to rallies and heated testimony during a State Board of Education meeting.

Much of the controversy has to do with a group of people who are proponents of "creationism" that are trying to alter the way evolution is presented in next year’s biology textbook, questioning the soundness of the theory.

Gov. Rick Perry inspected the water levels at Lake Travis and then urged voters to approve proposition 6, the water project funding program that would pay for the next 50 years of water projects in the state that is up for a vote on this November's ballot.