Ross Ramsey, Texas Tribune | KERA News

Ross Ramsey, Texas Tribune

Illustration by Anneke Paterson / Todd Wiseman

Some of Texas’ 36 congressional districts violate either the U.S. Constitution or the federal Voting Rights Act, a panel of federal judges ruled Friday.

Some of Texas’ 36 congressional districts violate either the U.S. Constitution or the federal Voting Rights Act, a panel of federal judges ruled Friday.

Graphic by Emily Albracht / Texas Tribune

A majority of Texans support banning Syrian refugees and blocking individuals from seven countries from entering the United States, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Graphic by Emily Albracht / Texas Tribune

In his second month in office, President Donald Trump is getting overwhelmingly good grades on his job performance from the state’s Republicans, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Emily Albracht / The Texas Tribune

Likely Republican voters in Texas have overwhelmingly negative opinions of the Black Lives Matter movement, while a majority of Democratic voters views the movement favorably, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Emily Albracht / The Texas Tribune

Texans are split on whether to subject American Muslims to greater scrutiny than citizens who observe other religions, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Emily Albracht / The Texas Tribune

A slight majority of Texans want transgender people to choose restrooms based on their birth gender and not their gender identity, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Ben Hasson / The Texas Tribune

Ask Texas voters how they think things are going, and the answer, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll, is a familiar one: A salute to Texas and a raspberry for the country.

EMILY ALBRECHT / TEXAS TRIBUNE

Voters in the party that has not lost a statewide election in Texas since 1994 are most likely to say that elections are fraught with criminality, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

The largest red state of them all is effectively sitting on the sidelines as Republicans begin their national convention in Cleveland.

DFW NORML

Most Texans would support the legalization of marijuana for medical use, and close to a majority would support legalization for any use, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Only 23 percent of Texas registered voters said marijuana should be illegal in all cases. Another 28 percent would legalize it for medical use only, and 49 percent would legalize marijuana for any purpose, either in small quantities (32 percent) or in any quantities (17 percent).

Bob Daemmrich / flickr.com/thetexastribune

After what are shaping up to be easy primary wins in March for the leading gubernatorial candidates, Republican Greg Abbott starts the general election race for governor with an 11-point lead over Democrat Wendy Davis, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Meanwhile, several statewide races on the Republican primary ballot — for lieutenant governor, attorney general and comptroller — appear headed for May runoffs. None of the leaders in those races looks close to the 50 percent support they would need to win next month's primary outright.

Attorney General Greg Abbott, the leading candidate for the Republican nomination for Texas governor, holds a single-digit lead over the likely Democratic nominee, state Sen. Wendy Davis of Fort Worth, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

In a head-to-head race, Abbott got 40 percent of registered voters to Davis’ 34 percent, with 25 percent of the voters undecided. In a three-way general election, he would get 40 percent, Davis would get 35 percent and Libertarian Kathie Glass would get 5 percent.

“What you’ve got is a race in which, for the first time in a long time, the Democrat is as well-known as the Republican at the outset of the race,” said poll co-director Daron Shaw, a professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin.