Rick Holter | KERA News

Rick Holter

Vice President of News

Rick Holter is KERA's vice president of news. He oversees news coverage on all of KERA's platforms – radio, digital and television. Under his leadership, KERA News has won 39 awards so far this year, including the station's first-ever national Edward R. Murrow Award for a video in its series One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life. He and the KERA News staff were also part of NPR's Ebola-coverage team that won a George Foster Peabody Award, broadcasting's highest honor.

Rick returned to Dallas in 2012 after six years at NPR, where he edited the shows Weekend All Things Considered and Day to Day, and supervised the Digital News operation. Before that, Rick spent 15 years at The Dallas Morning News, after editing stints at what was then the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times) in Florida and the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.

In addition to the Peabody, he’s collected honors including USC-Getty Arts Journalism Fellowships in 2005 and 2011, a National Headliners Award (2010), a NLGJA Award (2009) and numerous newspaper design awards. He also edited and designed a Pulitzer Prize-winning feature series (1992). A graduate of the University of Maryland, he grew up on a dairy farm in Middletown, Md.

Ways to Connect

Doomsday scenarios seem to be getting more common than solar eclipses. (Remember Harold Camping, the radio minister who declared May 21, 2011, as the day the world would end -- and then revised his doomsdate to Oct. 21?) The latest prophecy comes from the ancient Mayans, who supposedly identified Dec. 21, 2012, as the day of doom. NPR's David Greene talks with David Stuart, an expert on the Mayans from the University of Texas.

After 20 years in the Senate, Texas Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison bid farewell to colleagues in an emotional speech that urged more bipartisan cooperation.

North Texas has been more worried about West Nile virus lately -- with at least 35 deaths this year and hundreds of people sickened. But the granddaddy of mosquito-borne illnesses is still malaria, and NPR's Adam Cole explores how it spreads and how doctors have responded in this fun animated video. (Gin and tonic, anyone?)

Are you having trouble distinguishing between the fiscal cliff and Oak Cliff? Here's a handy guide, complete with charts and superstar GIFs, to how we got from surplus to cliffside, courtesy of the Washington Post's Wonkblog.

NPR's Robert Krulwich does it again: He clues us in to a way-cool video showing how a Japanese artist took a pool of oil (or something like it) and created a beautiful Christmas tree (or something like it). As Robert writes, "I imagine Neiman Marcus, the big Dallas-based department store, might want to try a Texas-sized version, suitable for oil barons with big living rooms."

The Nasher Sculpture Center announced today that it, too, is commissioning a piece of music to mark the assassination anniversary, joining the Dallas Symphony. David Mackey (below) is writing the Nasher's piece; 18-year-old Conrad Tao is working for the DSO.

NPR Music's strangely, spectacularly intimate concert series gets a visit from the Texas troubadour. Where else are you going to see Lyle Lovett pick up a cup of coffee midset and launch into a monologue about Iris Dement? And then deliver a haunting guitar-and-fiddle version of "If You Were To Wake Up?"

Last year, drought killed the grown-in-Texas Christmas tree business. This year brought more rain, but as NPR's StateImpact Texas reports, the remaining evergreens are pretty scrawny, and many buyers are looking elsewhere.

The guy who dreamed up that big funky cube next to Woodall Rodgers Freeway in downtown Dallas has added another trophy to his case: Thom Mayne is the 2013 Gold Medal winner from the American Institute of Architects. Art&Seek's Stephen Becker has the story.

The headlines since last week's announcement have focused on how the Dallas Museum of Art is offering free admission starting next month. But KERA's Jerome Weeks zooms in on the parts of the plan -- free membership and sophisticated geographic data mining -- that could prove to be long-term game changers for museums.

The former North Texas congressman helped found the Tea Party-affiliated group, which powered Republicans to a House majority in 2010. The Washington Post also reports that two other top FreedomWorks officials have left.

The piece, the Orpheus Mosaic, was purchased at auction more than a decade ago. “This is an ethical decision, not a legal decision,” museum director Maxwell Anderson said. Art&Seek's Stephen Becker has the story.

Two-and-a-half million Americans are considered the "working poor" -- that's the highest that number's been in at least the last two decades, says Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler, who joins Krys Boyd on Think today at 1 p.m. Shipler wrote the book The Working Poor: Invisible In America. The public radio show Marketplace recently took an intriguing look at day-to-day life for these people. A couple of the choicest cuts: Kids often are charged with chipping in, and families sometimes even split up just to make ends meet.

Under Rick Perry, the state provides $19 billion a year, a New York Times analysis finds.

The new Perot Museum of Science and Nature is tough to avoid in these parts, with its opening Saturday and the weeks  of coverage leading up to the big debut. But one of the coolest products just arrived: a time-lapse video showing the construction of architect Thom Mayne's landmark building.

The city of Dallas and AT&T are pairing up to build a golf course near Loop 12 and I-45, the Dallas Morning News reports. Their goal: A PGA-quality course that might just take over the Byron Nelson Championship, which has been played in Las Colinas for nearly 30 years.

Dallas-Fort Worth tops 'Forbes' magazine's list of cities where the biggest number of Americans are moving. And that's not the only good news for Texas: Austin lands at No. 3, Houston at No. 5 and San Antonio at No. 8.

Dallas Film Society

Larry Hagman, the actor who played the iconic J.R. Ewing in the TV series Dallas, died Friday after a battle with cancer in the city where he was filming the series’ revival for TNT. (The show starts its second season Jan. 28.) Hagman was 81, and he had a lasting impact on folks around the world, including KERA’s Rick Holter.

Peter Walker, the landscape architect for the Nasher Sculpture Center, weighs in on the controversy between the Nasher and the nearby Museum Tower. Charles A. Birnbaum, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Cultural Landscape Foundation, talked to Walker for the Huffington Post.

Interstate 10 has reopened near Beaumont after a 100-vehicle Thanksgiving-morning wreck that killed two and sent more than 50 people to the hospital. Police blamed fog.

Judge Says RIP, Hostess

Nov 21, 2012

Twinkies may be built to live forever, but a federal bankruptcy judge put the final nails in the coffin for Irving-based Hostess Brands today. The move clears the way for the Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos to go on the auction block.

Jerome Weeks / KERA

We may be on the cusp of winter, but things are pretty fiery in the demilitarized zone of the Dallas Arts District that lies between the Nasher Sculpture Center and Museum Tower.

92YTribeca / Flickr

Kevin Clash, the puppeteer who brought Elmo to life on Sesame Street, is stepping down after 28 years in the job.

The Texas Governor's short-lived presidential campaign wins a medal of (dis)honor from 'Washington Post' political blogger Chris Cillizza

Sen.-elect Ted Cruz has come out of his victory over Paul Sadler swinging. In a speech to the Federalist Society on Friday, he joked, "I’m pretty certain Mitt Romney actually French-kissed Barack Obama."

The unidentified man who made the allegations of an underage relationship with Kevin Clash, a longtime 'Sesame Street' puppeteer, has recanted his claim. The man's lawyer now says it was "an adult consensual relationship." The New York Times has the details.

So that petition encouraging Texas to secede from the union, which has been signed by tens of thousands on the whitehouse.gov site? The press secretary for Texas Gov. Rick Perry has weighed in, and it sounds like the governor thinks the United States should stay united.

Shutterstock

By shortly after 10 p.m., the math finally added up: Barack Obama will spend four more years in the White House.

KERA News staff  covered the night's action in a live blog. You can find final Texas results here. And for an expanded view of the blog, including video from PBS NewsHour, a Texas vote ticker and more, click here

Justin Terveen / theurbanfabric.com

We're all in mourning for Big Tex, the State Fair of Texas giant who burned today. (But fear not, Tex-a-holics: The fair says he'll be back and better than ever when the 2013 fair kicks off next September.) Until then, here are a few classic moments in Big Tex history:

Final details have been locked down for KERA’s Oct. 19 debate between Republican Ted Cruz and Democrat Paul Sadler, who are running to represent Texas in the U.S. Senate.

Pages