Rick Holter | KERA News

Rick Holter

Vice President of News

Rick Holter is KERA's vice president of news. He oversees news coverage on all of KERA's platforms – radio, digital and television. Under his leadership, KERA News won 29 awards last year; the KERA News staff was also part of NPR's Ebola-coverage team that won a George Foster Peabody Award, broadcasting's highest honor.

Rick returned to Dallas in 2012 after six years at NPR, where he edited the shows Weekend All Things Considered and Day to Day, and supervised the Digital News operation. Before that, Rick spent 15 years at The Dallas Morning News, after editing stints at what was then the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times) in Florida and the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.

In addition to the Peabody, he’s collected honors including USC-Getty Arts Journalism Fellowships in 2005 and 2011, a National Headliners Award (2010), a NLGJA Award (2009) and numerous newspaper design awards. He also edited and designed a Pulitzer Prize-winning feature series (1992). A graduate of the University of Maryland, he grew up on a dairy farm in Middletown, Md.

Ways to Connect

Are you having trouble distinguishing between the fiscal cliff and Oak Cliff? Here's a handy guide, complete with charts and superstar GIFs, to how we got from surplus to cliffside, courtesy of the Washington Post's Wonkblog.

NPR's Robert Krulwich does it again: He clues us in to a way-cool video showing how a Japanese artist took a pool of oil (or something like it) and created a beautiful Christmas tree (or something like it). As Robert writes, "I imagine Neiman Marcus, the big Dallas-based department store, might want to try a Texas-sized version, suitable for oil barons with big living rooms."

The Nasher Sculpture Center announced today that it, too, is commissioning a piece of music to mark the assassination anniversary, joining the Dallas Symphony. David Mackey (below) is writing the Nasher's piece; 18-year-old Conrad Tao is working for the DSO.

NPR Music's strangely, spectacularly intimate concert series gets a visit from the Texas troubadour. Where else are you going to see Lyle Lovett pick up a cup of coffee midset and launch into a monologue about Iris Dement? And then deliver a haunting guitar-and-fiddle version of "If You Were To Wake Up?"

Last year, drought killed the grown-in-Texas Christmas tree business. This year brought more rain, but as NPR's StateImpact Texas reports, the remaining evergreens are pretty scrawny, and many buyers are looking elsewhere.

The guy who dreamed up that big funky cube next to Woodall Rodgers Freeway in downtown Dallas has added another trophy to his case: Thom Mayne is the 2013 Gold Medal winner from the American Institute of Architects. Art&Seek's Stephen Becker has the story.

The headlines since last week's announcement have focused on how the Dallas Museum of Art is offering free admission starting next month. But KERA's Jerome Weeks zooms in on the parts of the plan -- free membership and sophisticated geographic data mining -- that could prove to be long-term game changers for museums.

The former North Texas congressman helped found the Tea Party-affiliated group, which powered Republicans to a House majority in 2010. The Washington Post also reports that two other top FreedomWorks officials have left.

The piece, the Orpheus Mosaic, was purchased at auction more than a decade ago. “This is an ethical decision, not a legal decision,” museum director Maxwell Anderson said. Art&Seek's Stephen Becker has the story.

Two-and-a-half million Americans are considered the "working poor" -- that's the highest that number's been in at least the last two decades, says Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler, who joins Krys Boyd on Think today at 1 p.m. Shipler wrote the book The Working Poor: Invisible In America. The public radio show Marketplace recently took an intriguing look at day-to-day life for these people. A couple of the choicest cuts: Kids often are charged with chipping in, and families sometimes even split up just to make ends meet.

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