Krystina Martinez | KERA News

Krystina Martinez

Assistant Producer

Krystina Martinez is an assistant producer at KERA. She wakes up bright and early to produce local content for Morning Edition and KERANews.org. She also produces The Friday Conversation, a weekly series of conversations with North Texas newsmakers. 

The Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) named Krystina a New Voices scholar in 2016, which is awarded to early career talent shaping the future of public media. Krystina first joined KERA as a freelancer in 2013. She produced for Morning EditionAll Things Considered and Think, contributed stories, produced Ebola coverage and served as the local producer for StoryCorps’ North Texas visit in 2014. Prior to KERA, she interned at NPR’s Weekend Edition in Washington, D.C.

A North Texas native, Krystina is a graduate of West Texas A&M University. Say hello @ThisIsKrystina.

Ways to Connect

A recent study discovered that geography has a big effect on whether children will rise into a higher income bracket than their parents. The New York Times calculates the chances that a child will rise from the bottom fifth percentile of income to the top fifth. The number in the Dallas area is 6.4 percent; kids in the Fort Worth area have a better shot, at 8.8 percent. Some of the study’s findings also concluded that geography mattered less for well-off children than for middle-class and low-income children.

Edward Beavers / Flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Texas Giant accident raises concerns over park safety, why you need a drink with that cigarette, cakes coming out of ATM machines, and more.

Almost a third of college students will transfer schools at least once within five years, and many opt to go to Texas. The U.S. News and World reports that Texas, Arizona, and California schools are the most popular places for new transfer students. Out of Texas schools, the University of North Texas, Texas State University and the University of Houston had the highest transfer acceptance rates.

JonJon2k8 / Flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: a new program provides safe alternatives to calling 911, Nelson Mandela gets a Texas-sized birthday party, The Daily Show rips on Texas, and more.

Stephen Paulsen, 54, resigned as principal of Arlington's Morton Elementary School after his arrest in Florida
Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office

  An Arlington elementary school principal was arrested on Tuesday in Boynton Beach, Fla., on charges of soliciting sex from an undercover officer posing as a teenage boy online. WFAA reports that Stephen A. Paulsen, 54, resigned as principal of Morton Elementary School the next day.

Texas Governor Rick Perry's office / Flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Gov. Rick Perry signs hotly contested House Bill 2 into law, another big cat succumbs to feline distemper in Wylie, Fort Worth scrambles to fix a really expensive mistake, and more.

Most police agencies are using license plate scanners, but that's not what has the ACLU worried. A new report finds that some departments, like the Grapevine Police Department, have accumulated millions of scans and have been storing that data for years.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Ted Cruz stands shoulder to shoulder with a Democrat to the delight and despair of pundits everywhere, North Texans are getting sick from unwashed fruits and veggies, Lone Star State-made sake could be the next big thing and more.

It looks like Stevie Wonder will not be performing in Texas anytime soon. The singer announced at a Quebec City performance that he will not be performing in Florida in protest of George Zimmerman’s acquittal in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. He went further to say that he will not perform in any state that recognizes the “Stand Your Ground” law. Texas and 23 other states currently have some form of the law.

Webster and Associates

Doctors for country music star Randy Travis say that his condition is improving after he was hospitalized last week for congestive heart failure and a subsequent stroke.

Pages