Kate Groetzinger | KERA News

Kate Groetzinger

Kate Groetzinger is an intern at KUT. She comes to us from Quartz, a digital media publication based in New York City, where she served as an Atlantic Media fellow. Prior to working at Quartz, Kate graduated from Brown University with a bachelor's degree in English. While at Brown, Kate served as an intern at Texas Monthly. Her work has been published online by Texas Monthly, CultureMap Austin, The Atlantic, Quartz, The Gotham Gazette, and Paste Magazine, and in print by Rhode Island Monthly. She is happy to be back in her home state reporting on news for her fellow Texans. 

From Texas Standard:

Stephanie Garcia is a high school student. She’s also a 24-year-old inmate at the Lockhart Correctional Facility, a minimum-security women’s prison in Central Texas. Outside, her life was hectic, but here, every day is the same.

From Texas Standard:

"What goes up must come down” is Newton's Third Law of Motion – and part of a 1960s song that you may now have spinning in your head. But the truth of those words is being tested right now in Waco, Texas.

I can tell you from experience that as soon as something good happens in Waco, something else sets the city back again. But that pattern of ups and downs changed with the arrival of “Fixer Upper,” the wildly popular HGTV show featuring local house-flipping team Chip and Joanna Gaines.

Pharmacists who refuse to fill prescriptions based on their religious beliefs may soon be protected from disciplinary action thanks to a bill passed this legislative session. 

Republican lawmakers in Texas have been inundated with messages over the past few days from constituents both supportive and concerned with President Donald Trump’s nominations and executive orders. So many people called into the Washington offices of Sens. Ted Cruz and John Cornyn over the weekend and Monday that staffers say they couldn’t keep up, leaving constituents frustrated by busy signals and full voicemail boxes.

Last week we launched TXDecides, our collaborative project with public radio newsrooms across the state. The goal was simple: Answer Texas voters' questions ahead of Election Day. Y'all had lots of questions. So many, in fact, that we had to pare down the questions to a scant five.

Luckily, we culled some of the remaining questions and decided to answer them as best we could. 

Since 1972, Texas has had a lower voter turnout rate than the national rate for presidential elections.