Doualy Xaykaothao

Doualy Xaykaothao covers breaking news from Asia for NPR News. She's based in Bangkok, Thailand, and her reports can be heard across all NPR News programs.

Xaykaothao joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition and has since worked as an NPR producer, editor, director and reporter for NPR's award-winning programs. As a producer for NPR's Newscast Unit, she was a member of the team receiving the 2001 Peabody Award for its coverage of the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, Xaykaothao began reporting about anti-war protests from Seoul, South Korea. A year later, Xaykaothao was in the Phang Nga region of Thailand reporting on the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In 2006, Xaykaothao served as a fellow for the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University-SAIS with a focus on women inside Nepal's 10 year civil war. Xaykaothao was also an Annenberg Fellow for NPR member station KPCC in Los Angeles in 2007, and was part of the reporting team to receive a LA Press Club Award for breaking coverage of the California wildfires. By 2009, Xaykaothao was in Indonesia reporting on the earthquake that devastated Padang. In 2010, she reported about North Korea's deadly attack on a South Korean warship. When Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, Xaykaothao was the first NPR reporter to reach Fukushima to report on the triple disasters in 2011.

Xaykaothao is Lao-Hmong American. She was born in Vientiane, Laos, but raised in France and the United States. She attended college in upstate New York, where she specialized in television, radio, political science, and ethnic studies. Her radio career began at Harlem community radio station WHCR 90.3 FM, where she volunteered as news-reader. Later, at Pacifica Radio's WBAI 99.5 FM, she worked for the station's resident film critic, the late Paul Wunder. At Pacifica, she also coordinated and produced Asia Pacific Forum, a program on politics, culture and arts inside Asian American communities, as well as missed stories from Asia.

For those who are curious, Doualy Xaykaothao is pronounced "dwah-hlee sigh-kow-tao."

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

There’s been an uptick in early voting in Denton, as much as 6,000 compared to the last mid-term election, and many say it’s because of a proposal to ban fracking within city limits. The city that sits on top of 500 square miles of valuable gas reserves could become the first Texas town to prohibit hydraulic fracturing.

Early voting for next week’s election continues through this Friday. Ronke Okpa isn’t on the ballot, but the Nigerian-American is actively involved with a group called Red State Women, and hosting fund-raisers for Governor Rick Perry and the Republican who hopes to replace him.

Cooper Neill/Texas Tribune

Fear and reactions to the Dallas Ebola cases are making news around the country.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Close friends of the young health care worker diagnosed with Ebola describe her as a nurse with passion. On Monday night, they prayed for her.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

In the northeast Dallas neighborhood of Vickery Meadow, where Ebola patient Thomas Duncan stayed before he was hospitalized, residents went about their day Friday as normally as possible. Dallas City Council member Jennifer Staubach Gates, whose district includes the neighborhood, has been trying to ease fears of residents.

Flickr / americannurseproject

The Dallas family that lived in an apartment where a Liberian man fell ill with Ebola has been moved to a different home.

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

A Dallas man diagnosed with Ebola spent the weekend around at least five school-children. Those students are now at home and will be monitored for fever, vomiting and other symptoms of the deadly disease. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

[For Thursday Ebola updates, click here.] The sister of the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States says he told officials the first time he went to the Dallas hospital that he was visiting from Liberia.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

On the campus of North Central Texas College in Gainesville, four softballs can be seen at the school's front entrance. Each has a number, a name, and the letters "RIP." 

 On Friday, an 18-wheeler hit a bus carrying 15 team-mates from the school's softball team, four athletes died.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Some North Texas students recently overdosed on synthetic marijuana. And prescription drugs are popular with younger teens. One group hopes arming parents with free drug kits might help turn things around.

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