Doualy Xaykaothao

Doualy Xaykaothao covers breaking news from Asia for NPR News. She's based in Bangkok, Thailand, and her reports can be heard across all NPR News programs.

Xaykaothao joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition and has since worked as an NPR producer, editor, director and reporter for NPR's award-winning programs. As a producer for NPR's Newscast Unit, she was a member of the team receiving the 2001 Peabody Award for its coverage of the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, Xaykaothao began reporting about anti-war protests from Seoul, South Korea. A year later, Xaykaothao was in the Phang Nga region of Thailand reporting on the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In 2006, Xaykaothao served as a fellow for the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University-SAIS with a focus on women inside Nepal's 10 year civil war. Xaykaothao was also an Annenberg Fellow for NPR member station KPCC in Los Angeles in 2007, and was part of the reporting team to receive a LA Press Club Award for breaking coverage of the California wildfires. By 2009, Xaykaothao was in Indonesia reporting on the earthquake that devastated Padang. In 2010, she reported about North Korea's deadly attack on a South Korean warship. When Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, Xaykaothao was the first NPR reporter to reach Fukushima to report on the triple disasters in 2011.

Xaykaothao is Lao-Hmong American. She was born in Vientiane, Laos, but raised in France and the United States. She attended college in upstate New York, where she specialized in television, radio, political science, and ethnic studies. Her radio career began at Harlem community radio station WHCR 90.3 FM, where she volunteered as news-reader. Later, at Pacifica Radio's WBAI 99.5 FM, she worked for the station's resident film critic, the late Paul Wunder. At Pacifica, she also coordinated and produced Asia Pacific Forum, a program on politics, culture and arts inside Asian American communities, as well as missed stories from Asia.

For those who are curious, Doualy Xaykaothao is pronounced "dwah-hlee sigh-kow-tao."

Galileo Jumaoas

Robert Hsueh, the D/FW International Airport board chair who was a longtime leader of the North Texas Asian-American community, has died.  

Hsueh, 63, died earlier this month from bone cancer.  

“Robert connected our Asian community with corporate America, and gave opportunities to our members in terms of procurement, contracting, doing business with the different public agencies here in the Metroplex, and most especially with the airport,” Galileo Jumaoas, president of the Greater Dallas Asian American Chamber of Commerce, told KERA.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

Mourners filled Dallas' Latino Cultural Center and talked about Adelfa Botello Callejo for hours.

Each ended the same way…

“Adelante con Adelfa … Adelante con Adelfa … Adelante con Adelfa.”

That’s "moving forward with Adelfa."

City of Dallas

A national search ended up at home today when Dallas hired a new city manager. It’s A.C. Gonzalez, who was No. 2 to Mary Suhm, the former city manager, for more than a decade.

Frank Vassen / Flickr

A North Texas man who paid $350,000 for the right to hunt an endangered African black rhino says he fears for his safety.

Corey Knowlton of Royse City says that after being revealed as the winner of last weekend's controversial Dallas Safari Club auction, he's received death threats and has hired full-time security. He told KTVT (Channel 11) Wednesday that some people "are wanting to burn my house down." One threat read: "I hope you die slowly and painful."

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

Just 10 days after a contentious public hearing with state officials, residents in Reno and Azle gathered Monday night to try and make sense of the swarm of earthquakes that keep rocking their part of North Texas. The latest quake hit just hours before the public meeting.

A West Texas prostitute from the 1930s has inspired an album, a play and now a Dallas bar on Lower Greenville. It's the latest reincarnation by long-time bar owner John Kenyon and it will soon open to the public.

If anyone's looking for the Mexican restaurant J Pepe's, look again, because it's now Vagabond, a space for music, craft beers and artists. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Critics of gas drilling will hold a public meeting in Azle Monday night.

The meeting comes as more earthquakes continue to rock the area northwest of Fort Worth. A 2.2-magnitude quake struck near Azle on Saturday. And yet another earthquake hit near Azle Monday morning, registering 3.1.

Texas Tribune

In Grapevine Thursday, Lt. Governor David Dewhurst announced five education issues that he’d like state lawmakers to focus on before the next legislative session.

Speaking at a luncheon to benefit the United Negro College Fund, Dewhurst instructed the senate committees to do their homework and return with ideas that will help further improve education in Texas.

Shutterstock

It took hours, behind closed doors, but Dallas City Council members narrowed their list from six candidates to three -- interim Dallas City Manager A.C. Gonzalez, former North Carolina county manager David Cooke, and Deanna Santana, a city administrator in California.

A second round of interviews will begin next week.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

The frigid temperatures across North Texas have forced those experiencing homelessness to stay inside emergency shelters beyond the norm.

Near downtown Dallas, at the Austin Street Center, residents collect their personal items after enjoying a hot meal and a hot shower.

Sitting on a cot with a pink blanket, Sherry Hamilton, 45, says it’s nice to have a warm bed when temperatures outside are in the teens.

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