Domenico Montanaro | KERA News

Domenico Montanaro

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's lead editor for politics and digital audience. Based in Washington, D.C., he directs political coverage across the network's broadcast and digital platforms.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and has taught high-school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in Journalism from Columbia University

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a die-hard Mets fan and college-basketball junkie.

Long doubting the efficacy of television ads, Donald Trump is finally ceding to this one measure of political gravity, airing his first ad of the general election.

Donald Trump's missteps since the conventions have put Hillary Clinton in a dominant position.

If the election were held today, according to the latest NPR analysis of polling, demographics and on-the-ground reporting, Clinton would win in a landslide of 2008 proportions. She has solidified her leads in key battleground states and crosses the threshold of 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House in the NPR Battleground Map with just states where she already has a significant lead.

If it's Friday in politics, there's the potential for a news dump.

President Obama reiterated that he believes Donald Trump is "unfit" to be president, issuing a sharp rebuke of the Republican nominee from the White House East Room on Tuesday.

"Yes, I think the Republican nominee is unfit to serve as president," Obama said in response to a question from a reporter during a news conference with Lee Hsien Loong, the prime minister of Singapore. "I said so last week, and he keeps on proving it."

Tim Kaine is boring. Just ask him.

"I am boring," the man Hillary Clinton picked on Friday night to be her running mate said last month on NBC's "Meet The Press."

The Virginia senator tried to play it off with something of a dad joke: "But boring is the fastest-growing demographic in this country," he laughed.

So why would Clinton pick "boring" to be her vice president? (And it's not because there are suddenly loads of more boring people out there voting as a bloc.)

This past month has seen lots of news events with potential consequences to politics — controversial police shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, La., followed by the killing of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge. Plus, there was the horrific incident in Nice, France, that saw scores killed when a man drove a truck through a crowd watching fireworks on Bastille Day.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5 Things To Know About Mike Pence

Jul 14, 2016

The buzz about Donald Trump's vice presidential pick is centering on Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The Indianapolis Star is reporting that Pence "is dropping his re-election bid in Indiana to become Donald Trump's running mate."

When I first heard the news after midnight Thursday that a sniper had killed police officers in Dallas, my first thought was, "Oh, no."

"Oh, no" for the officers and their families, for those trying to peacefully protest recent police shootings. But that "Oh, no" was also for what could come next and a fear for our country, for race relations, for an American people in the midst of a dark presidential campaign that is threatening to tear at the seams of the fabric of our quilted country.

Tuesday was a mixed bag for Hillary Clinton.

She escaped a recommendation of an indictment from the FBI, removing the biggest storm cloud over her in this presidential campaign.

But it did not come without significant pain for Clinton, because while FBI Director James Comey did not recommend a formal indictment to the Department of Justice, he served up an indictment of her judgment.

No president has campaigned strongly for his chosen successor in at least 100 years.

Tuesday's event, with President Obama campaigning for Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state and onetime rival, in North Carolina is remarkable for that reason. It kicks off what is likely to be a season of vigorous campaigning by the president.

The past month has not been kind to Donald Trump.

He has landed in controversy on everything from how much he (eventually) gave to veterans groups to Trump University (and the judge who he declared biased because of his Mexican heritage) to his response to the Orlando shooting.

Things are not going well for Donald Trump.

On Monday, he fired his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski. Lewandowski ran the campaign on a shoestring budget and a strategy that was largely built off and fueled by the candidate's say-whatever personality and brand.

In an abrupt shift in message, Donald Trump indicated Wednesday that he might be taking on a Republican tenet: the party's long-standing opposition to gun control.

Trump said he would talk to the NRA about not allowing "people on the terrorist watch list, or the no fly list, to buy guns." In typical fashion for the presumptive Republican nominee, the announcement came via Twitter:

The NRA, for its part, says there's no conflict:

In a statement, the NRA said it would be "happy to meet with Donald Trump." But that:

Two days after Hillary Clinton secured enough delegates to be the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party, President Obama endorsed Clinton on Thursday in a video. The two will campaign together next week in Wisconsin.

The Democratic Party about to nominate a historic candidate. That candidate's opponent not ready to accept that reality.

Bernie Sanders?

No, Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Hillary Clinton has secured enough delegates to be the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, according to an updated count by The Associated Press. She is the first woman ever to head a major-party ticket in this country.

Trump University was no university the way most people think of one.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bernie Sanders' campaign has requested a "recanvass" of voting in the Kentucky primary — not a "recount."

They are not the same.

What's the difference?

As NPR's Asma Khalid noted on air — a recanvass will "entail checking all of the voting machines and absentee ballots in all each of the state's counties to verify the accuracy of the vote totals."

In other words, individual ballots will not be checked. A recount would have re-checked how people voted on actual ballots.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Hillary Clinton would have a significant electoral advantage over Donald Trump in the general election, based on an NPR analysis.

The Democratic former secretary of state would start out with already exactly enough electoral votes to win the presidency, 270-191, based on states considered safe, likely and to lean toward either candidate. The ratings, which will be updated at least monthly until Election Day, are based on fundamentals — historical trends and demographics, plus reporting and polling (both public and private).

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Every week, we say the next race is pivotal, perhaps decisive even. Every week, it's... true, but in different ways.

Championing "stability" and protectionism, Donald Trump managed a sendup of the foreign policies of the last three American presidents, as well as the candidate he is likely to face this fall in a general election — Hillary Clinton.

"With President Obama and Secretary Clinton, we've had ... a reckless, rudderless and aimless foreign policy — one that has blazed a path of destruction in its wake," Trump charged in a sober foreign policy address at a hotel in Washington. He added, "[T]he legacy of the Obama-Clinton interventions will be weakness, confusion and disarray."

Hillary Clinton now has 2,141 delegates (with pledged and superdelegates combined), as of midnight Wednesday.

That means she is 90 percent of the way to the 2,383 delegates she needs to clinch the Democratic nomination.

Taking superdelegates out of the equation, she leads Bernie Sanders by 351 pledged delegates. (Clinton has 1,622 to Sanders' 1,282.) Sanders would need two-thirds of all remaining pledged delegates to overtake Clinton in that count.

The primary elections across five states Tuesday could decide the nominations of both parties.

That's especially true on the Democratic side. (For the Republicans, scroll down.) Bernie Sanders has come a long way, but the Vermont independent is running out of friendly states. Tuesday is no different, as all but one of the contests (Rhode Island) in these Northeast states are closed primaries.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The last time there was a contested convention, when the nominee wasn't known going into the convention, was 40 years ago.

Back then, incumbent President Gerald Ford led Ronald Reagan, but he didn't quite have a majority. That changed before the first ballot at the convention. How? Rides on Air Force One, state dinners, and ... persuasion.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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