Courtney Collins | KERA News

Courtney Collins

Reporter

Courtney Collins has been working as a broadcast journalist since graduating from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 2004. Before coming to KERA in 2011, Courtney worked as a reporter for NPR member station WAMU in Washington D.C. While there she covered daily news and reported for the station’s weekly news magazine, Metro Connection.

At KERA, Courtney is lead reporter for the series “One Crisis Away,” about life on the financial edge. Courtney has won awards from the Texas Associated Press Managing Editors, Texas Medical Association, Houston Press Club and the inaugural consumer financial reporting award presented by the Public Radio News Directors Inc. and the National Endowment for Financial Education. “One Crisis Away” was also recognized by the Radio Television Digital News Association and National Endowment for Financial Education for excellence in personal finance reporting. Courtney was also part of the team that won a national Edward R. Murrow award in 2017 for Excellence in Video.

When she’s not at work, Courtney loves to read and play outdoors with her husband and wild toddler.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Two weeks ago, Rowlett resident Lindsay Diaz got news that her storm-damaged home had been demolished by mistake.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

The top local stories this evening from KERA News: The Dallas County community of Sandbranch has no running water, sewer service or trash pickup. 

Courtney Collins / KERA news

The Dallas County community where about 100 people live without running water or sewer service has been approved to operate a water supply corporation-- a step toward bringing services there.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

KERA’s series, One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life chronicles families on the financial edge, trying to recover from the Christmas weekend tornadoes.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

A family trying to recover from Christmas weekend tornadoes got some startling news Tuesday.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

KERA's series One Crisis Away: Rebuilding a life, looks at tornado recovery for folks on the financial edge. It's estimated only 40 percent of people who lease apartments or houses have renters insurance. They need that money to buy food and pay the bills.

Maureen Barlin / Flickr

The homeless population in Dallas and Collin counties is up 24 percent from last year. That’s according to officials at Tuesday’s annual State of the Homeless address.

Lara Solt / KERA news special contributor

One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life follows four families on the financial edge, trying to recover from the Christmas weekend tornadoes.

Thorne Anderson / KERA news special contributor

KERA’s series One Crisis Away, Rebuilding A Life looks at four families left on the financial edge after December’s tornadoes. When the shelters close and the cameras disappear, recovery is only beginning.

Single mom Jenn Anderson had already rebuilt her life once. She picked up her two toddlers and moved to Garland shortly after her husband’s suicide in Las Vegas.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Texas Republicans turned out in droves to vote in Tuesday’s presidential primary. The race featured a cast of diverse candidates, and backers of all of them gathered at a sports bar in Dallas to watch the numbers roll in.

Lara Solt / KERA news special contributor

A dozen storms pummeled North Texas the day after Christmas, killing 13 people and destroying hundreds of homes. Nothing illuminates life on the financial edge like a tornado. That’s the focus of KERA’s new series, One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life.

photogal / Shutterstock

The top local stories this afternoon from KERA News: Tarrant County Sheriff Dee Anderson is in the middle of a primary challenge as he seeks his fifth and, he says, final term. His challenger: Former Dalworthington Gardens Police Chief Bill Waybourn.

SMU

Author Harper Lee, who died today in Monroeville, Ala., at age 89, is at the center of a treasure trove of literary artifacts at Southern Methodist University.

One jewel in the collection: A typewritten letter she wrote a decade ago-- to Oprah Winfrey.

Ed Schipul / Flickr

The top local stories this afternoon from KERA News: A big move today in the battle to bring more gambling to Texas horse and dog tracks: The state Racing Commission banned tracks from using what’s known as "historical racing."

Josh Davis / Flickr

The top stories this afternoon from KERA News: Administrators at Gilliam Collegiate Academy in Dallas told staffers to “manufacture or manipulate” exam grades—that news came in a report released Tuesday. It raises questions about whether some students graduated who didn’t earn the proper credits.

Stuart Seeger / Flickr

The top stories this afternoon from KERA News: The president and chancellor of Texas A&M came to a Dallas charter school Tuesday to apologize.

They told students at Uplift Hampton Preparatory they were sorry about the racial taunts the kids endured during a campus visit last week.

Julian Carvajal / Flickr

For families struggling to make ends meet, it’s hard to know where to find help. 211 Texas provides a roadmap.

The call service can help with everything from putting food on the table to Medicaid enrollment. Courtney Collins caught up with Tarrant County 211, which just released a report about who's been using the service.

Matthew Rutledge

A report released last week by Apartment List shows Texas rent prices jumped 3.5 percent last year, which outpaces the national increase. Other research shows almost half of Texans spend more than 30 percent of their income on rent.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

There are federal subsidies out there to help low income families pay for quality daycare. The problem is that money often takes months to come through. Two North Texas nonprofits are helping tide people over.

Bill Zeeble / KERA news

One in five Texas families doesn't have enough food to eat. As a result, many kids go to school hungry. That’s why school nutrition programs are so important -- and why, for the first time, the nonprofit Children At Risk, decided to rank them.

frankieleon / Flickr

Making money is one thing -- managing it is another. And new stats out from Creditcards.com prove that. The median income for Texas is better than average, but credit scores in the Lone Star State are some of the worst in the country.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Honoring the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with a day of service is a tradition North Texans are embracing. From painting murals to building wheelchair ramps, hundreds of volunteers spent the day giving back to their community.

Sophie Torres

It’s a dreary statistic, but it’s true: Most new small businesses fail within two years. The secret to success? Not just working hard, but understanding how to manage money.  

One workshop in southern Dallas is helping startups proceed with financial caution.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

More than 50,000 people from across the globe are streaming into the Dallas Convention Center. It’s the granddaddy of all outdoor expos: the Dallas Safari Club’s annual convention. 

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Adult coloring books are sweeping the nation. Many say they help relieve stress and unlock their inner artist. The Friends of the Dallas Public Library caught onto the craze and put together a book of their own, hoping to raise a little money. 

Over a thousand coloring books later, sales are still going strong.

Wendy Sanders / Facebook

It’s been a week-and-a half since a dozen tornadoes ripped through North Texas, killing 11 people and flattening hundreds of buildings. In Collin County, parents of 35 kids enrolled at a destroyed daycare are scrambling to re-arrange childcare.

Shutterstock

Most people won’t think about income taxes for another couple of months. But low-income families are already counting the days until they can file. 

iofoto / Shutterstock

When it comes to wealth, there’s a big gap between the “haves” and “have nots” in Dallas. And it turns out, those with means and those without don’t live very far apart.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

Between budgeting for gifts and coordinating travel, holiday to-do lists can be long and winding. For folks climbing out of homelessness, those to-do lists are longer, scarier, and much tougher to check off.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

For many people, the holidays mean hitting the stores, scouring the internet and for some of us, setting a budget. With that pressure to buy comes stress for folks living on the financial edge. According to WalletHub, one-third of Americans have already overspent.

As part of KERA’s series One Crisis Away at the Holidays, we meet two shoppers making tough decisions at the register.

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