Christopher Connelly | KERA News

Christopher Connelly

Fort Worth Reporter

Christopher Connelly is the first KERA reporter based full time in Fort Worth. He specializes in criminal justice and politics, and his reporting regularly is picked up by national shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace.

Christopher’s a supremely versatile reporter. He profiled Opal Lee, the 89-year-old who walked many miles between Fort Worth and Washington, D.C., to make her pitch for a national Juneteenth holiday. He got a rare look inside William “Tex” Moncrief’s home while reporting on a remembrance for powerhouse lawyer Dee Kelly. And he earned the only mainstream media interview with a reclusive state Board of Education candidate in East Texas who’d called then-President Obama a gay prostitute. That story earned Christopher a Lone Star Award from the Houston Press Club.

His coverage of policing after five Dallas officers were gunned down last summer was key to KERA winning “overall excellence” honors among the biggest radio stations, public and commercial, in Texas and Oklahoma in the regional Edward R. Murrow Awards.

Christopher came to Texas from WYPR in Baltimore, where he was state legislative reporter. His most memorable moment there involved dodging tear-gas canisters (and having a microphone ripped from his hand) while covering the violent reaction to the death of Freddie Gray, an African-American who died while in police custody.

He cut his public-radio teeth as a Joan B. Kroc Fellow at NPR – that’s a prestigious one-year post-graduate fellowship that allowed him to train as a reporter, show producer and digital producer at network HQ in Washington, D.C.

Christopher is a graduate of Antioch College in Ohio, and he earned a master’s in journalism from the University of California at Berkeley. He was born in Ohio, but his Texas roots run deep: He has aunts, uncles and cousins here, and he spent summers with his grandparents in Fort Worth.

Ways to Connect

Christopher Connelly/KERA

A signature piece of public art was dedicated Thursday at the center of Fort Worth’s ambitious Trinity River redevelopment project just north of downtown.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

For most of us, the word “auction” conjures up images of antiques or fine art or even foreclosed houses. Ritchie Bros. in Lake Worth offers a very different kind of auction – one on the scale of massive earth-moving equipment.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is escalating his effort to stop Syrian refugees from being resettled in the state. Just before Thanksgiving, his health secretary threatened to sue resettlement agencies that refuse to comply with his order.

Brandi Korte via flickr

The holiday shopping season kicks into high gear Friday (and, in the case of a few stores, Thursday night). When you start talking shopping strategies, it becomes pretty clear pretty quickly how differently we all approach the task. 

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

Dallas County District Attorney Susan Hawk unveiled a program that’s close to her heart on Monday. The new Reformative Justice Unit is aimed at keeping people with mental illnesses and young first-time offenders out of prison. Hawk says jailing young offenders can starts them down a path that leads to more crime.

Courtesy of the Fort Worth Opera

Race and policing was one point of discussion at a sweeping conversation in Fort Worth about the legacy of the civil rights movement in the decades after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. he conversation came just days before the Sunday anniversary of the assassination. It was part of a series of discussions the Fort Worth Opera is sponsoring as it prepares to premiere a new opera called “JFK." It follows Kennedy’s last hours in Fort Worth and Dallas. 

Gregory Hauenstein via Flickr Creative Commons

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Dallas on Tuesday. The former secretary of state spent the morning fundraising. Then she revved up hundreds of loyalists packed into a gym at Mountain View College in Oak Cliff.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

About 100 bicyclists spent Saturday morning riding along the Trinity River in Fort Worth as part of an event called The Great Seed Bomb. The riders tossed 4,000 seed bombs along the Trinity River in Fort Worth to build up habitat for bees and butterflies.

Glenn Harper via flickr

Texas Christian University announced Friday that it won’t allow concealed weapons on campus. That decision sets the private Fort Worth school apart from state universities that will be required to allow “campus carry.”

Christopher Connelly/KERA

World War II was a massive undertaking, a war fought on many fronts across half the world. Even with the draft, the government needed more soldiers. So every branch of the American military launched women’s units to aid in the effort.

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