Christopher Connelly | KERA News

Christopher Connelly

Fort Worth Reporter

Christopher Connelly is a KERA reporter based in Fort Worth. Christopher joined KERA after a year and a half covering the Maryland legislature for WYPR, the NPR member station in Baltimore. Before that, he was a Joan B. Kroc Fellow at NPR – one of three post-graduates who spend a year working as a reporter, show producer and digital producer at network HQ in Washington, D.C.

Christopher is a graduate of Antioch College in Ohio – he got his first taste of public radio there at WYSO – and he earned a master’s in journalism from the University of California at Berkeley. He also has deep Texas roots: He spent summers visiting his grandparents in Fort Worth, and he has multiple aunts, uncles and cousins living there now.

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Courtesy of the Fort Worth Opera

Race and policing was one point of discussion at a sweeping conversation in Fort Worth about the legacy of the civil rights movement in the decades after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. he conversation came just days before the Sunday anniversary of the assassination. It was part of a series of discussions the Fort Worth Opera is sponsoring as it prepares to premiere a new opera called “JFK." It follows Kennedy’s last hours in Fort Worth and Dallas. 

Gregory Hauenstein via Flickr Creative Commons

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Dallas on Tuesday. The former secretary of state spent the morning fundraising. Then she revved up hundreds of loyalists packed into a gym at Mountain View College in Oak Cliff.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

About 100 bicyclists spent Saturday morning riding along the Trinity River in Fort Worth as part of an event called The Great Seed Bomb. The riders tossed 4,000 seed bombs along the Trinity River in Fort Worth to build up habitat for bees and butterflies.

Glenn Harper via flickr

Texas Christian University announced Friday that it won’t allow concealed weapons on campus. That decision sets the private Fort Worth school apart from state universities that will be required to allow “campus carry.”

Christopher Connelly/KERA

World War II was a massive undertaking, a war fought on many fronts across half the world. Even with the draft, the government needed more soldiers. So every branch of the American military launched women’s units to aid in the effort.

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