Camila Domonoske | KERA News

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Little Rock, Ark., awoke to 6 inches of accumulation.

Just before dawn, rain became sleet became snow outside Nashville, Tenn. Flakes began to fall in Charlotte, N.C., and the Carolina mountains.

Former Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw, who was found guilty of raping and sexually assaulting multiple women while on his beat, was sentenced to 263 years in prison.

Holtzclaw's sentencing Thursday was temporarily delayed, after his attorney requested a new trial. Holtzclaw claimed there was evidence that hadn't been presented at trial.

The judge rejected the request, and sentenced Holtzclaw to 263 years in prison, to be served consecutively. That's the maximum sentence, and the one which had been recommended by a jury last month.

The Obama administration is implementing changes — voted into law by Congress late last year — that tighten the visa waiver program, specifically targeting Iran, Iraq, Sudan and Syria. But the administration is reserving the right to make exceptions on a case-by-case basis.

Aid convoys reached the besieged towns of Madaya, Foua and Kefraya on Monday. Since then, aid workers have reported horrifying scenes of malnutrition and deprivation.

Meanwhile, U.N. officials are emphasizing that the need in Syria extends far beyond those towns. Almost 400,000 people are living in besieged areas in Syria, the U.N. says.

Palestinian security officials have arrested an aide to the Palestinian peace negotiating team, accusing him of spying for Israel.

The arrest occurred two weeks ago, and the precise nature of the allegations aren't yet clear, NPR's Emily Harris reports:

"The man is suspected of passing information to the Israelis. The head of the Palestinian negotiating office, Saeb Erekat, confirmed that the arrest happened a couple weeks ago but wouldn't detail the man's job or assess how much damage may have been done.

In the wake of this weekend's prisoner exchange with Iran, a Twitter hashtag supporting Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian underwent a jubilant change: #FreeJason became #JasonIsFree.

The family of Robert Levinson, who went missing in Iran in 2007 and whose whereabouts remain unknown, started a frustrated hashtag of their own: #WhatAboutBob.

A day after many sanctions on Iran were lifted under the international nuclear pact, the U.S. Treasury department has imposed new sanctions — over Iran's ballistic, not nuclear, weapons.

The sanctions target 11 companies and individuals who have been involved in procuring goods for Iran's weapons program, the Treasury Department says.

"This action is consistent with the U.S. government's commitment to continue targeting those who assist in Iran's efforts to procure items for its ballistic missile program," the department said in a statement.

The four Americans who were part of a prisoner exchange between the U.S. and Iran have been released by Iran, a senior administration official confirms, and those who wished to depart the country have left.

A fifth American was released separately from the exchange.

The release of the prisoners was the result of "tireless" work by American diplomats, on the sidelines of nuclear negotiations with Iran, President Obama said Sunday.

"I've met with some of the families. I've seen their anguish — how they ached for their husbands and sons," Obama said.

Water contamination in Flint, Mich, — where the city switched water sources, causing pipe corrosion and ultimately filling the city's water supply with high levels of lead — has prompted President Obama to declare a state of emergency.

The move, which was requested by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, means FEMA is authorized to provide equipment and resources to the people affected. Federal funding will help cover the cost of providing water, water filters and other items.

Five years ago, Ted Williams became famous. The Columbus Dispatch posted a video of Williams, panhandling on the side of the road, showing off a pitch-perfect announcer's voice.

On Saturday, Iran released four detained Iranian-Americans and the U.S. released or pardoned seven Iranians, and dropped extradition requests for 14 more, in a highly choreographed prisoner exchange. Iran also simultaneously released a fifth American detainee.

Iran is releasing four Iranian-American prisoners Saturday, as part of a prisoner swap with the U.S.

The release, originally reported by Iranian state media, has been confirmed by U.S. officials. Iran is also releasing a fifth American detainee, separate from the exchange.

Tsai Ing-Wen, of Taiwan's pro-independence party, claimed victory in the nation's presidential elections on Saturday night.

With the vote count still underway, Tsai led with 60 percent of the vote, indicating a landslide victory; the ruling Nationalist party conceded defeat.

That makes Tsai the self-governing island's first female president.

An hours-long attack by militants on a luxury hotel in Burkina Faso's capital has left approximately 20 victims dead. An early-morning assault by security forces killed four attackers and freed 126 hostages, officials say.

Among the victims killed was an American, identified by the U.S. State Department as Michael James Riddering, according to Reuters.

The company that owns the leaking natural gas well in Los Angeles understated the number of air samples showing higher-than-usual levels of benzene, The Associated Press reports.

Adding to concerns over the disaster, efforts to stop the leak appear to have destabilized the well, the Los Angeles Times reports, raising the risk of a blowout.

Over the Easter holiday in 2015, millions of dollars worth of cash, gems and jewelry were stolen from a facility where London jewelers stored their wares. The audacious theft — which involved descending through an elevator shaft and drilling through concrete and metal walls — seized the attention of the world.

The Episcopal Church has been disciplined by the Anglican Communion, the international faith fellowship of which the church is a part, over deep disagreements about homosexuality and same-sex marriage.

The church has not been removed from the communion. However, it will be barred from Anglican decision-making for three years and will no longer represent the community in ecumenical or interfaith bodies, the Anglican organization has decided.

The World Health Organization announced Thursday that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is over — for now.

For the first time since the outbreak began in December 2013, all three of the hardest-hit West African nations — Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone — have had zero reported cases of Ebola for 42 days in a row. That's equal to two full incubation cycles of the virus.

Over the past two weeks, the Defense Department has transferred 14 detainees from the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

That leaves 93 detainees at the military prison in Cuba — the first time the prison's population has been below 100 since it opened in January 2002.

The most recent release was announced Thursday by the Defense Department.

So ... have you bought a Powerball ticket?

The jackpot is now at $1.5 billion — the largest jackpot in world history. (Full disclosure: NPR is playing the odds. Our CEO bought every regular full-time employee a ticket.)

The Internet had many, many responses to actor Sean Penn's account of meeting Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, which was published by Rolling Stone on Saturday: shock, anger, derision, astonishment, utter bafflement ...

But from one quarter, at least, there was pure excitement.

"EL CHAPO GUZMAN WEARING BARABAS SHIRT !" was the all-caps announcement from the clothing company Barabas.

A nuclear-capable B-52 bomber flew over an air base in South Korea in a move that was both a training mission and a show of force.

The low-level flight was conducted as a demonstration of U.S. commitment to South Korea, in response to a nuclear test by North Korea, the U.S. Pacific Command said in a statement.

Germany has started 2016 with a deep and bitter debate: How should the country respond to the New Year's Eve attacks in Cologne, in which mobs of men reportedly robbed and sexually assaulted women on the streets?

Concrete information about the night is sparse, and competing narratives abound.

Doctors Without Borders says a hospital it supports in Yemen was hit by a projectile Sunday morning, leaving at least four people dead and 10 injured.

The medical aid organization, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières or MSF, said more victims might still be trapped in the building's rubble.

Aid is due to arrive in the besieged towns of Madaya, Foa and Kefraya soon — possibly on Monday.

Meanwhile, an airstrike in the Idlib province has killed scores of people, and Syria's government says it will be willing to join peace talks in Geneva with some opposition groups.

One number has everybody's attention this afternoon. But why stop at one?

Here's the prize jackpot, plus a few other lottery stats worth knowing:

$900,000,000

The eye-popping, record-breaking Powerball jackpot value, as of Saturday afternoon. If no one wins tonight, the jackpot could crack a billion.

That's based on a single winner selecting the annuity option, which pays out over three decades. Alternately ...

Seventy-five thousand miles is long enough to cross the United States about 25 times. Long enough to circle the equator — three times.

And for 75 years, 75,000 miles was long enough to be legendary. Or more specifically, it was 75,065 miles — the miles-biked-in-a-year record set by Tommy Godwin in 1939 and never broken since.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán had seen his name in headlines. He knew it graced the world's Most Wanted lists.

But it appears that the notorious drug kingpin wanted something more: He wanted his name in lights.

It was a memorable name: Thelonious Monk, like the jazz musician.

And when Adam Marton read it, a decade-old memory came flooding back.

Marton is an editor at The Baltimore Sun. He was working on an infographic about the homicides in Baltimore in 2015 — a record 344 deaths, most of them black men, most of them shot to death.

Thelonious Monk was one of those victims. And years before, Marton says, Monk had stolen his car.

The U.S. economy added 292,000 jobs in December while unemployment held steady at 5 percent, according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The number of new jobs was higher than many economists had anticipated; NPR's John Ydstie says experts had expected about 200,000 new jobs.

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