Camila Domonoske | KERA News

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Martin Shkreli, the former pharmaceutical executive who inspired wrath when he raised the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent, appeared before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Thursday for a hearing on prescription drug prices.

But his testimony was far from fruitful.

At a one-day donor meeting in London, leaders and diplomats from 20 countries around the world have gathered to pledge funds to help victims of the ongoing crisis in Syria.

They hoped to raise $9 billion; they pledged a total of nearly $11 billion.

You can see some of the pledges, and hear about the conference from NPR's Greg Myre, over at Here & Now.

Among the noteworthy pledges: The U.S. has committed about $900 million, and Britain has offered $1.75 billion between now and 2020.

President Obama delivered remarks at a mosque in Baltimore on Wednesday afternoon, in the first visit to an American mosque he's made during his presidency.

His visit, which also included a roundtable with Muslim community members, ws intended to "reaffirm the importance of religious freedom" to life in America, the White House says.

He opened by thanking Muslim-Americans for their service to their communities, before declaring the importance of religious tolerance in America.

Previously, on Serial ...

"All this time I thought the courts proved it was Adnan that killed her. I thought he was where he deserved to be. Now I'm not so sure."

That's an email from Asia McLean to host Sarah Koenig, as read on the very first episode of Serial, the podcast sensation produced by the creators of This American Life.

Southern California Gas Co., the utility that owns a natural gas storage well that has been leaking since November, faces criminal charges over the leak and its alleged delay in alerting authorities to the problem.

The first real votes of the 2016 presidential election will be cast at the Iowa caucuses tonight, starting at 8 p.m. ET.

And that means there are a lot of questions in the air.

Will Donald Trump's lead in the polls translate to dominance in the caucus rooms? Will Iowa voters feel the Bern? What's the mood like on the ground? (You'll find answers at NPR Politics, with a wide range of reporting and analysis on the candidates, the voters and what it all means.)

An attack by Boko Haram on a village in northeastern Nigeria killed at least 65 people on Saturday night, according to Reuters.

A Nigerian military spokesman told the wire service that Boko Haram militants attacked the village of Dalori, near the city of Maiduguri in Nigeria's northeast.

The initial death toll was provided by a Reuters reporter who counted bodies, burnt beyond recognition, at a hospital morgue. The Associated Press, citing a local official, reports the death toll much higher, at 86 people.

One month down, two to go.

For unemployed adults in 22 states, that's how long they can count on help with the grocery bills: Starting this January, they have three months to find a job or lose their food assistance.

SNAP benefits — formerly known as food stamps — have been tied to employment for two decades. Unless they are caring for children or unable to work, adults need to have a job to receive more than three months of benefits.

Three explosions near a shrine revered by Shiite Muslims in Damascus have killed at least 45 people, according to reports from Syrian media and human rights monitors.

NPR's Alison Meuse, reporting from Beirut for our Newscast unit, says the Islamic State has claimed responsibility through its media outlets. She continues:

Facebook is changing its policies to ban users from arranging the private sale of guns on both Facebook and Instagram.

The new rules, first reported Friday, are stricter than Facebook's previous stance on gun sales, which allowed users to arrange such sales under some restrictions as long as they did not use Facebook ads.

The ban on person-to-person firearm sales comes after pressure from the Obama administration, state attorneys general and gun safety advocates, NPR's Laura Sydell reported for our Newscast unit.

A U.S. Navy warship sailed close to a disputed island in the South China Sea on Saturday, challenging maritime claims by China, Taiwan and Vietnam.

The trip near Triton Island, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, is what the Pentagon calls a "freedom of navigation operation."

At least 37 migrants have drowned after a ship sank in the Aegean Sea on the way to Greece, the Turkish Coast Guard says. The coast guard was able to save 75 people and continues to look for more survivors.

At least 10 children were among the dead, including four toddlers or infants, The Associated Press reports. The victims were mostly Syrians.

The Obama administration is proposing a new rule to address unequal pay practices by requiring companies with more than 100 employees to submit salary data by race, gender and ethnicity.

The announcement comes seven years after President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act — his first piece of legislation as president — which makes it easier for women to challenge discriminatory pay in court.

Four trapped miners in China have been rescued after spending 36 days underground, Chinese state media report.

The miners had been stuck in a gypsum mine in Shandong province since Dec. 25, after a collapse that killed at least one person and left more than a dozen missing.

In late December, NPR's Anthony Kuhn described the disaster for our Newscast unit:

Xerox will be splitting into two companies — one dedicated to document management, including the printing and copying technology that made Xerox's name, and another for business process outsourcing.

The split will be completed by the end of the year. The names of the two companies, as well as their leadership structures, have yet to be determined, Xerox says.

A wave of violence in Burundi last December resulted in the deaths of scores of people. Now Amnesty International says satellite images and video footage indicate that dozens of people killed by police were buried in mass graves.

"These images suggest a deliberate effort by the authorities to cover up the extent of the killings by their security forces," Muthoni Wanyeki, Amnesty International's Regional Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes, said, according to an an Amnesty statement.

You know it in your heart. You might not keep your New Year's resolutions. Your good intentions might fall on hard times. The plot might twist. You have no crystal ball.

Emily Dickinson noted it — the inscrutability of what's to come.

"The Future—never spoke—
Nor will He—like the Dumb—
Reveal by sign—a syllable
Of His Profound To Come—"

Local air regulators are suing Southern California Gas Co. over the massive ongoing natural gas leak near the Los Angeles neighborhood of Porter Ranch, seeking millions of dollars in penalties.

The civil suit alleges that the company's negligence led to injuries and has created "an ongoing public nuisance."

Shovelful by shovelful, snowplow by snowplow, the East Coast is digging its way out from underneath an enormous winter storm that blanketed much of the region with up to 3 feet of snow.

And as high winds and 36 hours of snow give way to clear skies and sunshine, some people are taking to the wintry landscape with glee.

When Southern California Gas Company finally manages to seal a natural gas storage well that's been leaking for months, the company will have to shut the well down permanently, California regulators say.

And in the meantime, the company will have to minimize air pollution from the ongoing leak and fund an independent study on potential health impacts on the surrounding community.

An earthquake of magnitude 7.1 struck the southern coast of Alaska early Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey says. The quake, which was centered just over 160 miles southwest of Anchorage, hit at 1:30 a.m. local time (5:30 a.m. EST), waking up many residents of Alaska's largest city.

A massive snowstorm that affected most of the East Coast finally ended Sunday morning, leaving in its wake 1-3 feet of snow over major cities, at least 18 storm-associated casualties and severe coastal flooding.

While the snow has stopped, the weather warnings continue. High winds will create blowing and drifting snow in some areas, the National Weather Service warns. And while New York City lifted a police-enforced travel ban on Sunday morning, many authorities are asking citizens to refrain from driving for another day as efforts to clear off the roads continue.

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Italy on Saturday to demonstrate in support of a bill that would allow same-sex couples to enter into civil unions.

The predominantly Catholic country is the last western European nation that doesn't offer same-sex couples any legal rights.

As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports for our Newscast unit, many activists are determined to change that.

Sylvia says the square outside the pantheon in Rome was packed on Saturday:

The snow will glow white on the mountains tonight — the Appalachians, that is, from North Carolina through Pennsylvania.

The wind is howling — gusts over 60 miles per hour in some areas, the National Weather Service reports — as this swirling storm moves up the coast.

A 13-year-old Palestinian girl was shot and killed by a security guard at a West Bank settlement after she attempted to stab him, according to Israeli police.

The police said the girl had fought with her family before leaving home with a knife, according to both AP and Reuters.

The girl's mother tells Reuters there hadn't been any trouble before the girl left the family's tent.

Now available on a mobile device near you: an app designed by Winston Churchill and Donald Rumsfeld.

Well, sort of.

The game "Churchill Solitaire," released for phones and tablets this weekend, is — according to the company releasing it — based on a version of the classic card game that was invented by the Prime Minister who led Britain through World War II.

And it traveled from Churchill's desk to modern iPhones by way of the Secretary of Defense who oversaw the U.S. war in Iraq.

Canadian police say four people have died and two others are in critical condition after a school shooting incident in a remote village in northern Saskatchewan. The prime minister and other officials earlier said five people were killed. One suspect is in custody.

As the incident unfolded, La Loche Community School, which serves students in seventh to 12th grade, posted on Facebook to say the school — and a nearby elementary school — were on lockdown and the public should stay away.

Sarah the cheetah, who holds the world record as fastest land animal, has died at 15.

Bill Johnson, the skier who was the first American to win Olympic gold in a downhill event, has died, the U.S. ski team says. He was 55.

"His passing closed the final chapter in a tumultuous lifetime that saw him rise to the highest level in his sport," the team said in a statement.

Johnson died in an assisted living facility in Oregon, after several years of deteriorating health following a stroke.

Little Rock, Ark., awoke to 6 inches of accumulation.

Just before dawn, rain became sleet became snow outside Nashville, Tenn. Flakes began to fall in Charlotte, N.C., and the Carolina mountains.

Pages