Caitlin Dickerson

Caitlin Dickerson is an NPR News Investigative Reporter. She tackles long-term reporting projects that reveal hidden truths about the world, and contributes to breaking news coverage on NPR's flagship programs. Her work has been honored with some of the highest awards in broadcast journalism, including a George Foster Peabody Award and an Edward R. Murrow Award. In 2015, Dickerson was also a finalist for the Livingston Award.

In 2015, her investigation into Secret World War II Mustard Gas Experiments uncovered new details about chemical weapons testing the U.S. government conducted on minority soldiers to look for racial differences that could be exploited in battle. The investigation showed that for decades, the Department of Veterans Affairs had been systematically denying compensation to test subjects who sustained injuries. The series of reports led U.S. government officials to admit, for the first time, to the race-based testing program, and resulted in the introduction of legislation that would make it easier for test subjects to secure VA compensation.

Dickerson has contributed reporting to NPR's coverage of major domestic and international news stories, including the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, in Orlando, Florida in 2016. In 2014, she reported from the U.S. on the West African Ebola outbreak, with stories about military efforts to prevent the spread of the virus on American soil, and the ethics of a push by American scientists to deploy an experimental vaccine in West Africa. She also contributed to NPR's New Boom series that explored the Millennial generation's impact on America.

Dickerson came to NPR in 2011 after graduating Magna Cum Laude from California State University, Long Beach, where she earned a bachelor's degree in International Studies and was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Before joining NPR's Investigations Team, she worked as a producer and editor on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition. Among her more memorable contributions are a series on addiction and a deep look at diversity in the television industry, which won a National Association of Black Journalists Salute to Excellence Award in 2014.

In secret chemical weapons experiments conducted during World War II, the U.S. military exposed thousands of American troops to mustard gas.

When those experiments were formally declassified in the 1990s, the Department of Veterans Affairs made two promises: to locate about 4,000 men who were used in the most extreme tests, and to compensate those who had permanent injuries.

But the VA didn't uphold those promises, an NPR investigation has found.

As a young U.S. Army soldier during World War II, Rollins Edwards knew better than to refuse an assignment.

When officers led him and a dozen others into a wooden gas chamber and locked the door, he didn't complain. None of them did. Then, a mixture of mustard gas and a similar agent called lewisite was piped inside.

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