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UT/TT Poll: Clear Sailing For Abbott, Patrick, Uncertain Waters For Bush, Miller

Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick are far ahead of their Republican primary opponents in the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll, but the Democrats running for those two high offices face more difficult paths to their party’s nomination.

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Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd. Monday-Thursday, noon-2 pm; Friday, 1-2 pm on KERA 90.1.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: In the dry, hot heart of Arizona lies the 372,000 acre Gila River reservation, home to the Native American Pima tribe. The local hospital, some telephone polls, and the occasional low-rise building interrupt the pale, flat desert vista of green, single story-tall cactus. Conditions appear so barren and harsh, one might conclude things haven't changed here for thousands of years, which is about as long as Native Americans have lived here.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble , KERA 90.1 Reporter: 17 year-old Andrew Martinez lives in the heart of San Antonio's Hispanic barrio with his mom, an aunt, and diabetes.

Andrew Martinez: The whole family's diabetic in this household.

Dallas, TX – Kurt Hubler, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When the R-S-R smelter first opened at Singleton and Westmoreland in the late 1930?s, it provided material used in ammunition for World War Two, by removing lead from automotive batteries. But residents like Patricia Stevens, now the President of the Westmoreland Heights Neighborhood Association, say growing up next to the facility was a battle in itself.

Dallas, TX – [Ambient sound of hyperbaric chamber]

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: 16 million people in this country have diabetes. While two-thirds know it, the rest - five and a half million - don't. It's called "the silent killer."

Margaret Eckerd, insurance employee and diabetic: I was just discovered to have the diabetes.

FORT WORTH – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When you walk into the Wayne Thiebaud exhibit, the first painting you'll see is a still life of cakes. They're 17 of them. All on simple cake stands. Exhibition organizer Stephen Nash of San Francisco describes Thiebaud's technique as "gooey," with paint almost dripping off the canvas.

Stephen Nash, Chief Curator of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco: Well, he is like a pastry chef in a way where he's actually decorating the cakes and pies with frosting, so to speak.

DALLAS – Virginia Whitehill, Activist and Grandmother: Jill, look at this. This is the woman who made - Grace Murray Hopper - made the modern computer possible.

FORT WORTH – Kenneth Barr, Mayor, City of Fort Worth: Motion by a vote of six to one. [Clapping]

DALLAS – [Ambient sound of Buddhists chanting]

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Devout Buddhists in Dallas begin each morning with 90 minutes of devotional meditation. They dress in black robes and sit on tiny platforms while incense and the steady beat of a spiritual chant fill the air.

[More chanting]

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: The speakers' list at yesterday's public hearing read like a "Who's Who" of Dallas community leaders. The heads of the League of Women Voters, the Chamber of Commerce, several private hospitals, and the Greater Dallas Community of Churches all turned out in support of Parkland's 31% tax increase. Ron Steinhart is chairman of the Dallas Citizens Council.

Dallas,TX – If Al Gore loses the election this fall, would his running mate, Joe Lieberman, be a likely prospect for president in 2004? Certainly Senator Lieberman was the star of the Democratic convention. It was his speech, said one observer, that ushered out the Clinton era and turned the party toward this year's nominees. Could he point the way also toward a Democratic restoration four, or eight, years from now?

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Latest from NPR

In more than three decades of work, Doug Jones has carved out a niche in the acting world by playing strange and otherworldly creatures. He was a demonic superhero in Hellboy and a monster with an appetite for children in Pan's Labyrinth.

But there was one storyline that proved elusive: Jones says, "I never saw romantic leading male [stories] coming with any creature roles."

Fifty years ago Monday, when Fred Rogers showed up on national public television as the host of what then was a brand new children's show called Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, TV was a lot different. PBS wasn't even a network then — not by that name, anyway — and aside from CBS, NBC and ABC, there were only a few independent local channels to watch, if that.

We expected the cold. It was, after all, the Winter Olympics.

But the wind is what has made an impression on many of us visiting Pyeongchang. It's even caused competition schedules to be rewritten.

For a string of days last week, the wind blew steady at 15 to 20 mph, with gusts of 45 mph. Concession stands and security scanners were toppled; temporary tents were blown away.

On the worst day, it looked as if a massive dust storm had descended. Three days later, we were still shaking sand out of our boots.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Atlanta Police are seeking an Uber Eats driver who they say killed a customer during a delivery.

The department confirmed to NPR that officers responded to a call of a person shot in the Buckhead neighborhood in north Atlanta on Saturday around 11:30 p.m. Investigators learned from witnesses that the victim left his apartment to meet an Uber Eats driver, took his order and began walking away from the delivery vehicle.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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After The Flood

Meet hurricane evacuees who decided to stay and build a new life in a new town.