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From 80 Degrees To Half A Foot Of Snow: 12 Days Of Christmas Weather In D-FW History

For all of you white Christmas hopefuls, know that a typical Dec. 25 in North Texas reaches the mid-50s with little-to-no measurable precipitation. But as National Weather Service records show, sometimes the biggest surprise on Christmas Day can be the weather.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: By the numbers, Governor George W. Bush is undoubtedly popular among Texas women. Two out of three female voters cast their ballots for him during his 1998 re-election campaign, including Taffy Goldsmith, a grandmother and long-time Dallas Republican activist.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Jacques and Natasha Gelman met by chance in the garden of a Mexico City hotel in 1938; but once they married three years later, they began a lifetime of deliberate and serious art collecting that was a mirror of both modern Mexico and the Gelman's own lives.

Eleanor Harvey, Curator of American Art, Dallas Museum of Art: I think they felt very strongly that the art was a part of their family.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: In the dry, hot heart of Arizona lies the 372,000 acre Gila River reservation, home to the Native American Pima tribe. The local hospital, some telephone polls, and the occasional low-rise building interrupt the pale, flat desert vista of green, single story-tall cactus. Conditions appear so barren and harsh, one might conclude things haven't changed here for thousands of years, which is about as long as Native Americans have lived here.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: In the dry, hot heart of Arizona lies the 372,000 acre Gila River reservation, home to the Native American Pima tribe. The local hospital, some telephone polls, and the occasional low-rise building interrupt the pale, flat desert vista of green, single story-tall cactus. Conditions appear so barren and harsh, one might conclude things haven't changed here for thousands of years, which is about as long as Native Americans have lived here.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble , KERA 90.1 Reporter: 17 year-old Andrew Martinez lives in the heart of San Antonio's Hispanic barrio with his mom, an aunt, and diabetes.

Andrew Martinez: The whole family's diabetic in this household.

Dallas, TX – Kurt Hubler, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When the R-S-R smelter first opened at Singleton and Westmoreland in the late 1930?s, it provided material used in ammunition for World War Two, by removing lead from automotive batteries. But residents like Patricia Stevens, now the President of the Westmoreland Heights Neighborhood Association, say growing up next to the facility was a battle in itself.

Dallas, TX – [Ambient sound of hyperbaric chamber]

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: 16 million people in this country have diabetes. While two-thirds know it, the rest - five and a half million - don't. It's called "the silent killer."

Margaret Eckerd, insurance employee and diabetic: I was just discovered to have the diabetes.

FORT WORTH – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When you walk into the Wayne Thiebaud exhibit, the first painting you'll see is a still life of cakes. They're 17 of them. All on simple cake stands. Exhibition organizer Stephen Nash of San Francisco describes Thiebaud's technique as "gooey," with paint almost dripping off the canvas.

Stephen Nash, Chief Curator of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco: Well, he is like a pastry chef in a way where he's actually decorating the cakes and pies with frosting, so to speak.

DALLAS – Virginia Whitehill, Activist and Grandmother: Jill, look at this. This is the woman who made - Grace Murray Hopper - made the modern computer possible.

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After The Flood

Meet hurricane evacuees who decided to stay and build a new life in a new town.

Latest from NPR

The chart on the screen looks like something out of a TV crime drama: an elaborate web of emails and phone numbers, some names and photos, all connected by a mesh of thin lines.

The man standing in front of the maze is an investigator. But if you met him at a bar, he'd probably tell you he's a software engineer. That's because his work is sensitive — but also, because he works for a tech company in Silicon Valley.

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Phillip Martin/WGBH News

Henry Lemus Calderón was, by his own admission, not perfect.

He attended services at Faro de Luz church in Nantucket where the Rev. Rigoberto Lemus presides. Lemus — a common Salvadoran name on Nantucket and no relation to Henry — said Calderón spent a lot of time behind church doors.

“We'd have a service Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, and he always came those days. He always [volunteered] to open the door, receive the brothers and sisters. And he’s a good person,” said Lemus.

Russia thanks CIA for tip that thwarted terror attack

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Courtesy of Creative Commons, user Ludvig14

President Donald Trump boasted Monday that a tip from the CIA had saved “thousands” of lives in Russia.

President Trump appeared to be referring to an alleged plot to attack targets in Russia’s St. Petersburg — including the Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan, a popular tourist attraction.

Matthew Petersen, who starred in an embarrassing video of his own confirmation hearing which showed him unable to answer some basic questions about trial procedures, has withdrawn his name from consideration to be a U.S. district court judge.

A White House official said Petersen withdrew his nomination, which the president has accepted.

KOKOKO! makes experimental afropop with found objects

2 hours ago

A-side B-side is a recurring segment on The World that compares the sounds and ideas of two songs, albums or artists. On the A-side: a folk or traditional selection; on the B-side: a contemporary selection.

There’s a repetitive ringing, smacking, clunking and zinging when you use a typewriter. It turns a a writer’s thought process into a percussive rhythm. That familiar, vintage sound has been repurposed now — by the Congolese musical collective, KOKOKO!

Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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