KERA News | News for North Texas

Top Stories

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

Robert E. Lee Statue In Dallas To Be Removed After Judge Tosses Restraining Order

An 81-year-old statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Oak Lawn's Lee Park can now come down. In a hearing Thursday, U.S. District Judge Sidney Fitzwater ruled the statue's removal didn't violate First Amendment rights. He also said the Dallas City Council didn't break its own rules when it voted Wednesday to remove the statue.

Read More

The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Each year in Tarrant County, the lives of some 2,000 children are painstakingly investigated and analyzed. These are the children state officials have reason to believe are abused or neglected. And if Child Protective Services deems their home is unsafe, then these children can be removed by the courts.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When the 1996 Telecommunications Act became law, the local phone service market exploded with new carriers. So when you make a phone call, you may start out on a Southwestern Bell line but end up on the network of one of its competitors. All the phone companies had to negotiate a way to determine who would absorb the costs for such a call. They came up with something called reciprocal compensation. Bill Maddox with Southwestern Bell explains.

Pages

Latest from NPR

Jonathan Guffey has chiseled youthful looks and, at 32, does not have the haggard bearing of someone who's spent more than half his life hooked on opioids. That stint with the drug started at 15 and ended — he says for good — 22 months ago. He has a job working with his family in construction, but his work history is pockmarked by addiction.

"I've worked in a couple of factories for a short amount of time, probably just long enough to get the first check to get high off of," Guffey says.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Strange Death of José de Jesús (Part 2)

44 minutes ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hurricane Irma is hovering somewhere between being the most- and second-most powerful hurricane recorded in the Atlantic. It follows Harvey, which dumped trillions of gallons of water on South Texas. And now, Hurricane Jose is falling into step behind Irma, and gathering strength.

Is this what climate change scientists predicted?

In a word, yes. Climate scientists like Michael Mann at Penn State says, "The science is now fairly clear that climate change will make stronger storms stronger." Or wetter.

"We had a parent go by and check on the chickens. They were fine and Wilson the cat was ok too! I know many people are concerned. What a wonderful community we have."

For the staff of Wilson Montessori, a public pre-K-8 school in Houston, the days after Harvey meant tracking down members of the community via text, collecting donations for those in need — and reassuring students about the fate of the school's pets.

Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd.

Our Most Popular Stories

www.flickr.com/photos/davehensley/

Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

Read More

Curated stories from KERA sent to your inbox.

One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.