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Robert E. Lee Statue In Dallas To Be Removed After Judge Tosses Restraining Order

An 81-year-old statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Oak Lawn's Lee Park can now come down. In a hearing Thursday, U.S. District Judge Sidney Fitzwater ruled the statue's removal didn't violate First Amendment rights. He also said the Dallas City Council didn't break its own rules when it voted Wednesday to remove the statue.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

Dallas, TX – This year's U.S. Presidential candidates have been putting more effort into reaching the nation's estimated 31.3 million Latinos, and a new survey indicates their attention is well warranted. A June-July poll conducted by a group of public broadcasters indicates that U.S. Hispanics believe strongly that they have a stake in this year's presidential election -- and that more than 5.8 million Latinos are preparing to vote.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Nearly one million people come to the United States to live each year. The majority of those immigrants are Latino, like Cuca Gonzalez and her family, who live on Fort Worth's north side.

[A woman pours a glass a juice and asks, in Spanish, "Do you want some?"]

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Education was the number two issue among Latinos, after racism and discrimination, in the Public Broadcasting Latino Poll 2000. That comes as no surprise to Dallas attorney Marcos Ronquillo. He recently served on the national board of MALDEF (the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund).

Marcos Ronquillo, Dallas attorney and MALDEF board member: I think everyone considers education a key to the American dream.

Plano, TX – [BAM!] Agghh; not bad.

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 reporter: Chris Nash, A/K/A Chris Chronic, is teaching 19 year-old Justin Williams some professional wrestling basics in the Slam Shack ring at the back of a recreation center in Plano.

Chris Nash, professional wrestler and teacher: You going to hit? You're going to have your arms out. [Slap!] Make it pop. Make it hurt. [BAM!] Give it a reason. Don't have your arms out there for nothing. Or they'll get hurt. Awright?

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Two weeks ago, when the Dallas City Council spent a full day debating the merits of a proposed new ethics code, the discussion was often acrimonious and sarcastic. Yesterday's vote carried some of the same tone...

Sound of Mayor Ron Kirk and Dallas City Councilwoman Laura Miller arguing

North Richland Hills, TX – Ambient sound of practice at the rink

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 reporter: More than a dozen young women from their teens into their thirties race around the rink at the Blue Line Ice Complex in North Richland Hills.

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Latest from NPR

"We had a parent go by and check on the chickens. They were fine and Wilson the cat was ok too! I know many people are concerned. What a wonderful community we have."

For the staff of Wilson Montessori, a public pre-K-8 school in Houston, the days after Harvey meant tracking down members of the community via text, collecting donations for those in need — and reassuring students about the fate of the school's pets.

The disaster relief bill moving through Congress can't come too soon for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Officials confirm FEMA's cash box could be empty as early as this weekend, right around the time that Hurricane Irma is scheduled to slam into southern Florida, while southeast Texas and Louisiana are still drying out from the Hurricane Harvey.

The agency can "easily go through $200 million in a day" according to Elizabeth Zimmerman, a former associate administrator at FEMA, "just gearing up, responding and being prepared for a disaster that's coming."

North Korea's neighbor of Japan is growing more alarmed by Pyongyang's advancing nuclear program, especially after a North Korean missile flew over the Japanese island of Hokkaido last week. It's led many residents to rethink the threat, even though they acknowledge they're largely powerless in this high-stakes geopolitical tussle.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.