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Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

'He Didn't Judge Me': Mentor Guides Troubled Fathers To Be Better Parents, Find Stability

Reggie Moss is a mentor to men of all ages, but mostly, to fathers struggling to raise their kids. He works at a faith-based nonprofit in Fort Worth with a mission to make better dads.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: DART's current plans for light rail in North Texas do not hinge on the results of Saturday's election. The same cities will get light rail service no matter how the vote turns out. The big question is when.

Jesse Oliver, Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Board Chair: It moves up on an average of five years.

Sprague: Jesse Oliver is chair of the DART Board.

Oliver: So rather than waiting until 2010, 2008 for that service, we're talking about 2004, 2006.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: As soon as former Superintendent Bill Rojas announced he wanted to leave the Dallas public schools, local business leaders began calling for trustees to consider hiring a non-traditional candidate: someone with management and leadership skills, but not necessarily a background in education. Dozens of community leaders turned out last night to voice their opposition to this proposal. Adelfa Callejo is a long-time Hispanic activist.

Dallas, TX – This year's U.S. Presidential candidates have been putting more effort into reaching the nation's estimated 31.3 million Latinos, and a new survey indicates their attention is well warranted. A June-July poll conducted by a group of public broadcasters indicates that U.S. Hispanics believe strongly that they have a stake in this year's presidential election -- and that more than 5.8 million Latinos are preparing to vote.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Nearly one million people come to the United States to live each year. The majority of those immigrants are Latino, like Cuca Gonzalez and her family, who live on Fort Worth's north side.

[A woman pours a glass a juice and asks, in Spanish, "Do you want some?"]

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Education was the number two issue among Latinos, after racism and discrimination, in the Public Broadcasting Latino Poll 2000. That comes as no surprise to Dallas attorney Marcos Ronquillo. He recently served on the national board of MALDEF (the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund).

Marcos Ronquillo, Dallas attorney and MALDEF board member: I think everyone considers education a key to the American dream.

Plano, TX – [BAM!] Agghh; not bad.

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 reporter: Chris Nash, A/K/A Chris Chronic, is teaching 19 year-old Justin Williams some professional wrestling basics in the Slam Shack ring at the back of a recreation center in Plano.

Chris Nash, professional wrestler and teacher: You going to hit? You're going to have your arms out. [Slap!] Make it pop. Make it hurt. [BAM!] Give it a reason. Don't have your arms out there for nothing. Or they'll get hurt. Awright?

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Latest from NPR

Many young American surgeons have a strong desire to do humanitarian work overseas. But their good intentions usually don't match up with the skills, such as cesarean section deliveries and fixing broken bones, that they'll need in poor countries.

And that means U.S. general surgeons, eager to do charitable work around the globe, may miss out on chances to help some of the neediest patients in the world.

More than two weeks after they were first spotted, wildfires on the west coast of Greenland are still burning, worrying local residents and drawing the attention of scientists.

The moments inside a courtroom in Orlando in 2007 were quick and consequential for Marquis McKenzie. The 16-year-old stood handcuffed behind a lectern. A juvenile judge announced his charges, then apologized that he could no longer take up the case.

"You're being direct filed," he told McKenzie, who was accused of armed robbery over a cellphone and a wallet. "You understand what I'm saying? You're being charged as an adult now."

McKenzie remembers his mother wailing from the courtroom benches, begging the judge to reconsider.

Pearce Tefft wrote a letter to members of his community in Fargo, N.D., to set the record straight about his family and the current state of his relationship to Peter Tefft, calling his son "an avowed white nationalist" who attended the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Think

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.