KERA News | News for North Texas

Top Stories

Shutterstock

Your Guide To May's North Texas Municipal Elections

Early voting begins Monday for municipal elections across North Texas. It’s a crowded field of council and school board candidates this year -- hundreds of candidates in scores of races across the region. Yet, local elections are often low-turnout affairs in North Texas.

Read More

The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Cuca Gonzalez was horribly sick last year when she arrived at the emergency room for John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Parkland's budget crisis began last year when it got hit with declining state and federal revenues. County commissioners had to raise taxes 10% to fund the hospital, but even then, administrators needed $30 million of Parkland's reserve funds to keep it operating. So the hospital began putting pressure on physicians to keep costs down. Susan Briner is a pediatrician at one of Parkland's seven community clinics.

Dallas, TX – Presidential wannabe Al Gore doesn't want to take credit for current gas prices. Yet, of the myriad things he has taken credit for - the Internet, Love Canal, "Love Story," and the economy - it's the one thing he genuinely has some responsibility for. After all, in his book, "Earth in the Balance," Gore wrote that higher fossil fuel prices were desirable as a national energy policy, and he cast the tie-breaking vote for 1993's gas tax increase.

DALLAS – Enoch Diaz, Harwood Street resident: This kite here, my daughter, that was her first little project. I save it. I save all this little stuff from the kids, from the years back. (Laughs)

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter (to Diaz): You're taking it with you?

Diaz: Those are all good memories.

KHVN 970 AM announcer (on tape): Heaven 97. It is now time for a special edition, a special program, a 15-minute program on the Lee Alcorn controversy.

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: The controversy that rocked Dallas's African-American and Jewish communities began Monday. Local NAACP President Lee Alcorn was appearing on KHVN, a black gospel radio station, when he criticized Al Gore for picking Senator Joseph Lieberman, who is Jewish, over an African-American as his running mate.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: DART's current plans for light rail in North Texas do not hinge on the results of Saturday's election. The same cities will get light rail service no matter how the vote turns out. The big question is when.

Jesse Oliver, Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Board Chair: It moves up on an average of five years.

Sprague: Jesse Oliver is chair of the DART Board.

Oliver: So rather than waiting until 2010, 2008 for that service, we're talking about 2004, 2006.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: As soon as former Superintendent Bill Rojas announced he wanted to leave the Dallas public schools, local business leaders began calling for trustees to consider hiring a non-traditional candidate: someone with management and leadership skills, but not necessarily a background in education. Dozens of community leaders turned out last night to voice their opposition to this proposal. Adelfa Callejo is a long-time Hispanic activist.

Pages

Race, Poverty And The Changing Face Of Schools

Take a deep dive into how four different high schools in North Texas have changed over the decades.

_

Latest from NPR

How to hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence

4 hours ago
8
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jiuguangw/8129557462/">Jiuguang Wang</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence — known as SETI — got a boost in 2015, when philanthropist Yuri Milner announced plans to inject up to $100 million into the field over the next decade.

Not long ago, both the Economist and the New Yorker magazines featured unflattering cover portraits of President Trump holding a golf club. Both seemed to suggest the president had found himself in a rough patch.

Inside a tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn lies the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual "candy alchemist."

He calls himself "Eugene J.," and this real-life Willy Wonka is whipping up his own new confections across town from where Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will open on Broadway later this month.

Not much is known about this quiet man in black, who prefers to keep the focus on the candy. Behind a purple satin curtain, he toils away on his latest invention.

The 700 cows on Brett Reinford's dairy farm are making more than just milk.

Each day, the girls are producing 7,000 gallons of manure. And that smells exactly like you'd imagine. "We had gotten complaints from neighbors in the past that had said, 'Hey, it stinks too much. Can you do something about it?' " Reinford says.

So he looked around for a solution and landed on a device called a digester. A digester tamps down the smell a bit, but, more importantly, it takes all that cow poop and converts it to electricity.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa.

Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter.

Weekdays 10 a.m. on KERA FM

Our Most Popular Stories

www.flickr.com/photos/davehensley/

Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

Read More

In-Depth Interviews

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.