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Urgent Care Clinics For Cancer Patients Provide Faster, Cheaper, Safer Emergency Treatment

Cancer patients face special challenges in addition to the disease — like complications from chemotherapy and weakened immune systems. Hospitals are recognizing that cancer patients need special emergency care, too.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

The last orca to be born in captivity at SeaWorld died Monday after just three months of life, the company announced. The calf, named Kyara, succumbed to "some very serious and progressive health issues over the last week" at SeaWorld's park in San Antonio.

Ten people died in sweltering heat in a semi-trailer that was found early Sunday in a Walmart parking lot on the South side of San Antonio.

Contrary to what you may have seen on social media, the so-called "Goldwater rule," a code of ethics prohibiting most psychiatrists from giving opinions about the mental state of anyone they have not evaluated, remains in effect.

The rule re-emerged in headlines Tuesday in the form of an article on the health news website Stat News.

A Wisconsin company is offering to implant tiny radio-frequency chips in its employees – and it says they are lining up for the technology.

The idea is a controversial one, confronting issues at the intersection of ethics and technology by essentially turning bodies into bar codes. Three Square Market, also called 32M, says it is the first U.S. company to provide the technology to its employees.

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Charles Reed/ICE via Reuters

Most Sunday evenings in the rural South Florida town of Homestead are quiet. Young people congregate at a handful of restaurants that sell Salvadoran pupusas, Honduran baleadas and Mexican enchiladas.

They stop for ice cream and chat on the sidewalks, or sit on the numerous park benches that populate the cement square outside City Hall. Sometimes their parents or elders usher them into one of the town’s Pentecostal churches.

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

Uber's leadership already has a lot on its plate, starting with finding a new CEO after former chief Travis Kalanick resigned abruptly last month. But that's not all the tech giant has to do. For the business to survive, Uber also has to repair its relationship with drivers, which leaders at the company say is "broken."

Texas State Sen. Van Taylor
Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

Texans could soon have more direct control over the property tax rates that cities, counties and special purpose districts set as legislation that stalled during the state Legislature's regular session is taken up by both chambers this week.

As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be.

An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players.

Many of us react to the buzzes and beeps that come from our phones with the urgency of a parent responding to a baby's cry. We can't help but pick up our phone and look at the latest notification. We know this probably isn't the healthiest nor the sanest response to a vibrating hunk of a metal, so we tell ourselves we should be less distracted. We shouldn't be so gripped by social media or the churn of work email.

Surgeons have several options when it comes to rebuilding breasts after surgery related to breast cancer. But for replacing nipples, women have fewer choices.

A startup biotechnology company in San Antonio is working to develop a better way to rebuild nipples after cancer surgery. Two young scientists saw a niche and decided to try and fill it.

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Latest from NPR

There are some epic public apologies out there: the church's apology to Galileo, for instance, or Tiger Woods' apology to his wife.

This one, below, is a personal favorite.

But even with the Bill Clinton lower-lip bite, this one pales in comparison to the historic mea culpa issued this weekend.

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Senate TV/Handout via Reuters

Sen. John McCain described America as a "beacon of liberty and defender of the dignity of all human beings," in an impassioned address on Tuesday.

So what does that sound like to the rest of the world, especially in the Donald Trump era?

"In countries like China, countries like Russia, they point to America's political woes at the moment and they say, 'You see, we told you this messy Western democracy, it was never a good idea. They can't take decisions. They're completely stuck,'" says David Rennie, DC bureau chief for The Economist.

In the seven years since the Affordable Care Act was passed, CEOs of U.S. health care companies have made a lot of money.

Their compensation far outstrips the wage growth of nearly all Americans, according to reporter Bob Herman, who published an analysis this week of "the sky-high pay of health care CEOs" for the online news site, Axios.

At 10:43 a.m. Wednesday, inmate and convicted murderer Ronald Phillips was pronounced dead, executed via lethal injection by the state of Ohio — the first time the state has carried out a death sentence in more than three years.

Phillips' death at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville may mark the end of one chapter in the state's battle to find a legally permissible means of execution – and the state may soon begin carrying out many more death sentences.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.

In-Depth Interviews

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.